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Old 06-18-2006, 09:49 AM   #1
Blickfang
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Join Date: Jun 2006
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Default Layout tips for a »dissertation« [title edited]

Hello all!

I'm new in DTP and just started to play a little bit with »Scribus«, that free DTP-
program available for Linux (and for Windows as well, as I think).

At the moment, I'm writing a paper for school (about 40 pages) with the topic
»Network applications with PHP and MySQL«, and it's not really a »scientific«
one. Since that, I wanted to give it a kind of fresh, modern look . . .

Unfortunately, I didn't succeed. I had some ideas, but all turned out to be horri-
ble when I tried to set them in Scribus.

. . . So, I would be very happy if some one of you could give me some tipps/
advices for a good layout.

============

Besides, I have some concrete questions, too:

I think the traditional 9-division-type-area (sorry, I don't know how it's called
in English) doesn't fit well for a paper, wouldn't a division into more parts be
useful?

Should I use a heading line or not?

I thought about using the fonts »Day Roman« and »Piqiarniq« (since they
seem to be nice free fonts). Do they fit together?

============

Thank you very much in advance!

Last edited by Blickfang; 06-19-2006 at 11:53 AM.
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