DTP


 
Lively discussions on the graphic arts and publishing — in print or on the web


Go Back   Desktop Publishing Forum > General Discussions > Print Production & Automation

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-21-2005, 12:09 AM   #1
Mike
Staff
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Llanwrtyd Wells
Posts: 1,450
Default Decisions, decisions ...

Life seemed simple when I decided to by an Epson R1800 -- I just had to wait till I'd saved the money.

Then people started talking about the new 2400.

Now I've just read a mini-review of the Stylus Pro 4800. It's all too much.

I have a client (on the days I work as a picture framer) who is an artist and she's looking for someone to produce high-quality prints of her paintings. The place she used to go to for prints is no longer producing prints of sufficient quality and there doesn't seem to be anyone else in the area providing the service. I'm wondering if maybe I should start.

Does anyone know if the 4800 would provide good quality prints onto canvas or similarly textured paper? What else should I consider before embarking on this?

   
__________________
Mike

www.welshframing.com
Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2005, 03:57 AM   #2
LoisWakeman
Staff
 
LoisWakeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Uplyme, Devon, England
Posts: 1,402
Default

Have you read this? http://luminous-landscape.com/review...-Preview.shtml

I for one would love to be able to try any of the new Epson printers - and I speak as a Canon enthusiast, at least printer-wise.
LoisWakeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2005, 07:13 AM   #3
Mike
Staff
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Llanwrtyd Wells
Posts: 1,450
Default

Thanks for the reference. It certainly makes the 4800 sound good. Unfortunately, like the other reviews I've read, it doesn't discuss what media can be used with the printer.

   
__________________
Mike

www.welshframing.com
Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2005, 12:58 PM   #4
terrie
Staff
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,946
Default

>>mike: Does anyone know if the 4800 would provide good quality prints onto canvas or similarly textured paper? What else should I consider before embarking on this?

Yes...it will...in that respect it is the similar to the Epson 4000. I hadn't realized until someone mentioned it to me that one of the big differences between the 4000 and the 4800 is that with the 4800, you have to switch out the matte black and photo black inks--there's a high price for this in terms of ink usage.

Given that you would probably be using the matte black ink on canvas and art papers, this issue would probably be moot...

The advantage to the 4800 is that it's using the new K3 ultrachrome inks which are supposed to be "better" than the older ultrachrome inks used in the 4000. Additionally the 4800 has new technology in the way that the inks are processed--they are in some way pressurized which is supposed to be better.

The 4000 is a *big* printer!!! I was really intimidated by it when my neighbor helped me to unpack it and get it on the table. The shipping weight on the 4000 is approximately 127lbs and the printer itself weighs 88lbs. My guess is that the 4800 will be similar. Make sure you've got help when it is delivered and make sure you've got a relatively sturdy table to put it on--I'm using my old dinning room table for my 4000.

Now...about paper...

The 4000 is classed as a wide-format printer. It prints up to 17" wide. It has 4 different paper paths--via the front paper tray, via roll, manual feeding above the front paper tray and manual feeding via the back using the front portion of the roll paper holder. I've not yet used roll paper--I've actually removed the roll paper holder so that I could push the printer back a bit further on the table--so I use the front paper tray which feeds paper automatically or manual feeding from the front.

The 4000 prints on canvas (more and more suppliers are doing 17" rolls) and I'm about 99% certain that the 4800 will also. I've not printed on canvas. Most of the paper I use is from Hawk Mountain Art Papers ...I use their Osprey Textured and Condor Bright White almost exclusively--lovely, lovely paper. I also print on 10x7" (5x7 folded) watercolor cardstock--Strathmore Creative Cards.

While the 4000 paper profiles that come with the printer are not bad even with 3rd party papers, I had custom paper profiles done for the Hawk Mountain papers and the Strathmore Creative Cards paper and they were worth the $40 (each) cost.

You might want to check out these 2 yahoo groups:

Epson 4000

Epson WideFormat

Also check photo-i as he has lots of useful info...

And... Rob Galbraith's info

Hope this helps...let me know if you have more questions


Terrie

Last edited by terrie; 06-21-2005 at 01:31 PM.
terrie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2005, 11:50 PM   #5
Mike
Staff
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Llanwrtyd Wells
Posts: 1,450
Default

Thanks a lot, Terrie. I've started following up the references and there's a lot of good information in them. I may well come back with some questions but it will be a while before I've digested all the information you've pointed me to.

Having to change inks when swapping from mat to glass does sound a real PIA. I guess Epson decided they'd rather sell lots more ink than add $10 or so to the cost of the printer in adding an extra cartridge slot. I still have my 1280 so I imagine I could continue using that for printing glossy photos and reserve the 4800 for mat work -- I used to think a lot of photos looked beter on mat paper when I used to use darkroom printing methods.

   
__________________
Mike

www.welshframing.com
Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2005, 12:35 PM   #6
terrie
Staff
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,946
Default

>>mike: I may well come back with some questions but it will be a while before I've digested all the information you've pointed me to.

You're welcome...glad you found the links useful...feel free to ask away...'-}}

>>Having to change inks when swapping from mat to glass does sound a real PIA. I guess Epson decided they'd rather sell lots more ink than add $10 or so to the cost of the printer in adding an extra cartridge slot.

Exactly...I was really surprised when I found out about that...for me, it actually wouldn't be all that big a deal as I never print on glossy paper...

>> I still have my 1280 so I imagine I could continue using that for printing glossy photos and reserve the 4800 for mat work

Sounds like a plan...you could always get 2 4800's...one for matte and one for glossy...LOL!!!

>>I used to think a lot of photos looked beter on mat paper when I used to use darkroom printing methods.

I always perferred matte paper when I had my darkroom...I've never been fond of glossy prints not sure why...

You might also consider buying a 4000 instead of the 4800...while you'd "lose out" on the new K3 inks, you'd have the advantage of being able to print both matte and glossy without changing the carts *and*, the price on the 4000's will obviously be coming DOWN...

Perhaps you can find a dealer who would be willing to print a image of yours for you on both printers on something like Epson Enhanced Matte paper (so that you don't run into paper profile issues) and compare them?

I'm sure that there are UK members on both the Epson 4000 and the Epson Wideformat list who might do that for you...

Terrie
terrie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Contents copyright 2004–2014 Desktop Publishing Forum and its members.