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Old 04-02-2012, 08:24 PM   #1
Kayza
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Default Adobe CS5 speed

My daughter has what should be a pretty decent machine for running CS5 - i5, 4GB ram, Win764bit, dedicated video and a decent hard drive (1 TB). However some operations are extremely slow. I'm wondering if RAM is likely to be her problem.

Any suggestions on tracking this down? I've already gone through her machine to get rid of any background junk that doesn't need to be there.

Thanks!
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:30 PM   #2
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Has she partitioned the drive at all? What size is her Page File? When was the last time she defragged--not sure that's as useful/helpful as it used to be.

Malware/spyware possible? A virus?

OH! One last thought...

What percentage of RAM has she assigned in Photoshop? Not sure this is still the case but when RAM got less expensive and people started loading up on it, the logical thing was to give Photoshop a fairly larger percentage--like 70%-80%--and that proved not be be a good idea because it actually slowed things down and the recommendation was to set Photoshop's RAM somewhere in the neighborhood of 40%-60%...

Hope one of the above ideas proves useful...'-}}

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Old 04-02-2012, 10:27 PM   #3
Kayza
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No partitions (except for the built in recovery partition). I haven't had her defrag - it certainly has not been useful in any other situation I've seen in the last couple of years. Definitely no malware.

I will have her look at the page size. She has Windows 7 - I'm not sure that it allows explicit memory partitioning, but I'll definitely check that out.

Thanks!
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Old 04-03-2012, 08:00 AM   #4
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No partitions (except for the built in recovery partition). I haven't had her defrag - it certainly has not been useful in any other situation I've seen in the last couple of years. Definitely no malware.

I will have her look at the page size. She has Windows 7 - I'm not sure that it allows explicit memory partitioning, but I'll definitely check that out.

Thanks!
Windows doesn't allow explicit memory partitioning but some apps have settings that control how much memory they ask Windows to allocate right off the bat. I'm guessing that this is what Terrie's talking about.

   
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Old 04-03-2012, 12:24 PM   #5
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steve: Windows doesn't allow explicit memory partitioning
No, it doesn't but you can play with the PageFile--both where it goes and how big to make it--but I'm not sure how differently Win7 handles that compared to WinXP. I have my PageFile established on its own partition and the Photoshop Scratch file is also established on its own partition--and a physically different drive from the Windows' PageFile...


>>but some apps have settings that control how much memory they ask Windows to allocate right off the bat. I'm guessing that this is what Terrie's talking about.

Yes...Photoshop (at least version 7 and suspect newer versions via Edit > Preferences > Memory & Image Cache) allows you to specify how much of the installed RAM to use and often lowering that value (unintuitively) makes for a better/faster Photoshop processing...

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Old 04-03-2012, 04:42 PM   #6
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Thanks for that. We'll definitely look at it.
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Old 04-03-2012, 08:04 PM   #7
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kayza: Thanks for that. We'll definitely look at it.
Let us know what you find...

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Old 04-03-2012, 09:50 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayza View Post
My daughter has what should be a pretty decent machine for running CS5 - i5, 4GB ram, Win764bit, dedicated video and a decent hard drive (1 TB). However some operations are extremely slow. I'm wondering if RAM is likely to be her problem.

Any suggestions on tracking this down? I've already gone through her machine to get rid of any background junk that doesn't need to be there.
Have you monitored the machine with Task Manager to see which processes are hogging resources, and which resources they're hogging?

   
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Old 04-04-2012, 03:18 PM   #9
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I have looked at task manager when she is not working, and I didn't see anything big. Would the Adobe programs spawn enough separate processes to tell us something useful?
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Old 04-11-2012, 01:45 PM   #10
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I have looked at task manager when she is not working, and I didn't see anything big. Would the Adobe programs spawn enough separate processes to tell us something useful?
The Performance manager will lay it all out for you. If the app isn't using any CPU and isn't doing any I/O your slowness doesn't reside with the app (in question).

Cntl-Shft-Esc to bring 'er up.
Flip to the Processes panel.
Check overall physical RAM utilization (at the bottom) and if that isn't excessive (i.e., > 90%) then look at the specific application's memory usage.

Check for Page Faults (or rather the rate of) to see if paging *was* occurring.

Check the application's Working Set.

Check the I/O columns (for symptoms of excessive I/O). Keep in mind that most write operations are WAY slower than reads (for all forms of persistent storage).

The answer lies in those things...

If you don't see anything alarming with the application itself, flip over the the Services panel and check some things there. Also, check the checkbox that says "Show processes from all users" to see if Windows itself or something that's shimmed into it (like a driver or service or shared DLL) is behaving badly.
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