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Old 06-09-2011, 12:26 PM   #1
ktinkel
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Default The Linotype at 125 years

The Atlantic remembers the mighty Linotype typesetter, dubbed the “Eighth Wonder of the World by Thomas Edison.

The clanking of Linos was standard at newspapers and print shops until the 1950s and 1960s, when offset printing and photo- and digital typesetting made creating pages and printing them much cheaper and easier.

I spent my teen-age years proofing copy for a newspaper right next to the noise, heat, and smell of the Linotype machines. This article conveys some of that, and more (despite a few minor inaccuracies).

   
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Old 06-09-2011, 02:49 PM   #2
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Me too although just as a vacation job in High School and they did let me set a little type though I doubt it ever appeared in the paper etaoin shrdlu

If you haven't gone back to the comments, at the bottom, at the moment, is an interesting one from an 82 yr old Traveller who has written a book, now out of print but he's given it to Google Books for free reading or downloading.

http://www.theatlantic.com/technolog...ment-221563485

actually works as a link (RMC / Copy shortcut on the time of posting)

There's a corrected link to the book.

   
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Old 06-09-2011, 04:46 PM   #3
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Thanks, Hugh. I’ll take a look.

I can still evoke the aroma of a Lino shop in my brain.

   
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Old 06-09-2011, 05:39 PM   #4
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Like some of the commenters on The Atlantic -- I had a slug with my name on it .... once upon a time.

I've read some chunks of the book already especially about the travellers including the women printers.

Nice to know that there are still a few machines operating ....... even if under museum conditions. I imagine most "underdeveloped" economies would have jumped straight to computerized type setting.

   
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Old 06-10-2011, 06:16 AM   #5
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It is not the smell, but the sounds that I remind. I consider the sound of a Lino under a skilled operator to be pure music.

I was offered a chance to buy an Intertype (a Lino clone) about 15 years ago. Alas, I had no place with the 9 foot headroom the machines needed. I still rue the day. It might have been the last Lino type of machine in London, Ontario. After they called me, they called the scrap metal dealer.
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Old 06-10-2011, 07:48 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Hugh Wyn Griffith View Post
Like some of the commenters on The Atlantic -- I had a slug with my name on it .... once upon a time.
I have such a slug, somewhere. Also had my name set from Monotype, but it fell apart; but have the type somewhere.

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Nice to know that there are still a few machines operating ....... even if under museum conditions. I imagine most "underdeveloped" economies would have jumped straight to computerized type setting.
That is true only when/as they gained access to digital fonts. The Japanese were early; Arabic was later, for example. Meanwhile, the trusty Lino was chugging away.

   
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Old 06-10-2011, 07:50 AM   #7
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I was offered a chance to buy an Intertype (a Lino clone) about 15 years ago. Alas, I had no place with the 9 foot headroom the machines needed. I still rue the day. It might have been the last Lino type of machine in London, Ontario. After they called me, they called the scrap metal dealer.
Ouch. Now you’d probably need to buy a letterpress printing company to get one!

   
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Old 06-11-2011, 09:09 AM   #8
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The first time I visited our agent in Japan, in Osaka, I saw their Japanese typewriter!

Now that I think of it it bore a remarkable resemblance to a Monotype machine although the matrix was square feet not inches!

I also saw why they had so many fax machines since a lot of correspondence was hand written in Japanese and faxed.

   
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Old 06-12-2011, 06:45 PM   #9
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I have one of those name slugs from a paperboy tour of the Dallas Morning News in my junior high years.

Later, in 1974, I saw another variation in printing technology transitions. At a newspaper in Saigon, I watched typesetters setting type by hand. Then they'd pull ... hmm ... wouldn't call it proofs, I suppose ... but slicks from the set type. Those slicks were pasted up into pages used to produce plates for offset printing.

   
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Old 06-13-2011, 11:13 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by John Spragens View Post
Later, in 1974, I saw another variation in printing technology transitions. At a newspaper in Saigon, I watched typesetters setting type by hand. Then they'd pull ... hmm ... wouldn't call it proofs, I suppose ... but slicks from the set type. Those slicks were pasted up into pages used to produce plates for offset printing.
That is how the type I pasted up in the early 1960s was set. The type was set on a Lino, which was proofed to heavy paper (2 or 3 copies) and a sheet of glassine to use for checking and positioning. We cut up these galleys for paste-up.

Very soon, though, independent typesetters popped up all over NYC with photo-typesetting machines. Then our type came in on photo paper. Its main advantage was that the type didn’t smear when it came in contact with rubber cement.

   
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