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Old 09-21-2010, 03:08 PM   #6
groucho
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Join Date: Oct 2004
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At this late date...

I'm surprised no one hit the obvious way to meet the budget. A bleed is always larger than the finished trim size. So if you want to use a standard frame size, you print on 8-1/2 x 11" letter sized paper--but TRIM to 8x10, US standard photo size, and use the matching standard photo size 8x10 frames for the plaques.

If the boss wants a bleed, he's got to pay for paper that is larger than the finished trim size, and he's going to have to pay extra for the TRIMMING itself. Unless you get one of the "photo" grade inkjet printers, because some of them will print a full bleed on some paper sizes. The catch-22 there is that they are more expensive--and the ink "overspray" eventually has to be cleaned out of them.

On a physical printing press (which it won't pay to use for runs of less than perhaps 500 pieces in any case) you can indeed run a full bleed on any sheet--but may make a total mess, not only from the grippers but from a starwheel tracking it down the center of the page and other issues. A lot depends on the skill of the pressman, and the quality of the press itself.
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