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Old 07-05-2010, 06:17 PM   #1
Andrew B.
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Default Backup Software

I'm getting the impression from reading here and on Csi that Acronis True Image Home 2010 would be a good product for me to use for backups. Do you agree?

Also, can this software restore a single file to a folder other than the one it was backed up from?
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Old 07-06-2010, 05:28 AM   #2
Michael Beloved
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Acronis has one consideration which might be worth thinking of:

You must have it installed since the file system used is proprietary. That means that if you migrate it to another computer, it must be installed on that computer first or you will not be able to open any files.
Once I had a full back up from a computer and then I reformatted the disk. When I tried to restore the back up I could not do it because the new OP did not have Acronis installed.

The other thing is that you cannot open any of the backup files unless you use Acronis to do so.

There are other companies which do not use proprietary software which permit you to open the files from any generic OP without having to have a special program on the computer.

In regards to PC's I noticed that with Win 7 you can do image back up which is something that Microsoft did not accommodate before.
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Old 07-06-2010, 06:01 AM   #3
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The other thing is that you cannot open any of the backup files unless you use Acronis to do so.
There are other companies which do not use proprietary software which permit you to open the files from any generic OP without having to have a special program on the computer.
For my money, that would rule out this product. The idea of my files being held ransom by some proprietary system just doesn't bear thinking about.
How do you make a backup of the app itself - and then restore that onto a fresh hard drive that doesn't have the app? What if the company goes bust?
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Old 07-06-2010, 06:21 AM   #4
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>> How do you make a backup of the app itself - and then restore that onto a fresh hard drive that doesn't have the app? What if the company goes bust?

It comes as an installer EXE just like any other app. Burn a CD or DVD with the EXE and you can install it elsewhere. It's been a while since I used it but ISTR that you can also use it to burn a set of backup CD/DVDs including a first disk that you can boot to (ie, so you can do a restore to a blank HDD).

Again, it's been a while since I tried it ... this may be fixed by now, but it was flakey on my system and I didn't care for the fact that it wanted to install services that ran full time. I wanted to use it to make backups *when I wanted to* and to get out of the way otherwise. It didn't want to do that. It went away.

Other people I respect swear by it.

   
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Old 07-06-2010, 06:23 AM   #5
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For my money, that would rule out this product.
How do you make a backup of the app itself - and then restore that onto a fresh hard drive that doesn't have the app? What if the company goes bust?
If you make an image to a bootable disk, the software you need is part of the bootable disk.

Some time ago, I got one of our staff a new computer with Vista on it. After her initial positive reaction to the aesthetics of the system, she got really upset with the abysmal performance. Since I had the "downgrade" licensing available, I used acronis to create an image from another system with similar hardware, but that was running XP and restored it to her system. It worked quite smoothly.
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Old 07-06-2010, 06:38 AM   #6
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Acronis uses a .tib file type. About a year ago I purchased their software, thinking that it was like any other and on the label there was no statement about the proprietary file type.

Once I wanted to open a file to copy it from the external hard drive but could not so it on another computer in which Acronis was not installed.

I thought that something was wrong with the computer because it could not open any of the back up files. After a day of doing this and doing that, I went on the Web and got a hint that their file type was special.

I called them and they made it clear that .tib zip files of their system must be opened initially by their software and then it can be copied or whatever.

So from then on I stopped using their stuff

For information on .tib files, you may scour the Internet to get some up to date information.
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Old 07-06-2010, 08:05 AM   #7
Hugh Wyn Griffith
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For one thing there is a menu item on TI that asks if you want to make a bootable recovery CD so there is no real problem in restoring to a new hard drive or to restoring onto a new different computer.

If you use Windows you use a proprietary operating system ......

The current versions of TI (2010 with 2011 in beta) are extremely quick to start up -- it used to take 2008 and 2009 several minutes to "analyse" my hard drives before asking what I wanted to do but 2010 is lightning fast.

From an image of a whole drive (and you can image more than one drive on the same PC at a time) your can restore the image or dig down inside the image to get at individual files and folders. I've not actually done this but I'm pretty certain it asks you where you want to restore to, as it does for a whole image.

I've used the WIN 7 imager on my desktop with XP and WIN 7 multibooted and one quirk which I noted but can understand is that it insisted on imaging the XP drive as well as the WIN 7 drive, because the multiboot information is on the XP drive.

Makes sense if you want a system to boot up again and because IIRC if you install WIN 7 on an empty drive with no other OS's it creates a small hidden partition that contains the boot information.

   
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Old 07-07-2010, 01:15 PM   #8
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Hugh. One thing I just read is that read is that TI can't deal with the MBR, and so if you have multi-booting set up there the image restore will not reflect this.
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Old 07-07-2010, 03:26 PM   #9
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I don't think that is correct -- partly because one of the questions it asks is whether you want to include the MBR and I had to ask a while ago why/why not and partly because I've done multiple restores of Windows 7 on a multiboot machine with XP WIN 7 32 and WIN 7 64 when I've been beta testing Norton products.

They want each new beta version issued to be installed on a clean OS, not after using Remove Programs to get rid of its predecessors and so I made an image of Windows 7 with some utilities like Irfanview etc, and after running Windows Update and then just restored that and ran Windows Update again for anything issued since. If there was a lot and I had time then I made a new image and then installed the beta.

It never affected my multiboot system and would be with TI 2009 and 2010.

   
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Old 07-08-2010, 02:27 PM   #10
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I have been using Acronis TI for years. I found it when I could not get Norton Ghost to work for me. Acronis uses a Linux-based recovery cd that boots and runs on pretty much any computer (I have seen ones it did not like). I suggest using it ONLY for image backups. The newest version offers file backup and continuous backup (OK, every five minutes). The file BU is probably OK, but I have seen reports of problems with continuous. For that matter, I have issues with ANY form of continuous backup, other than mirrored drives. The 2011 version understands Windows 7 image files. I think it even understands virtual disks (VBox, VMWare, Windows VM) of various types, but have not explored that.
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