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Old 06-20-2010, 02:42 PM   #8
terrie
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kayza: I don't have them handy, but I think that they are about 5x8, but may not be exact. Also, they don't use the same cards each time, so I could not guarantee exact size.
Who is "they"? Is there a reason not to standardize the card size which seems to me would make life easier...'-}}


>>I finally got them to stop buy the really heavy stock. The current printer simply won't handle it. I'd say moderate weight. (The company they were buying doesn't list the weights.)

My HP 2200D laser printer really sucks at feeding the Strathmore Creative Cards cardstock which is relatively heavyweight cardstock which is annoying since my old HP6MP did it with ease--while I print the cards on my Epson 4000, I used to use the HP6MP to print text on the inside my cards. Because of that I use my Epson 4000 now exclusively when doing anything with the cardstock and it feeds the cardstock just fine. I think you will find that any photo inkjet printer will feed and print cardstock with no problems.

The reason I asked about the size is that if you were to go with one of the wide-format inkjet printers (like my Epson 4000 which prints 17" wide), you need to be aware that there may be limitations on how narrow your paper can be. After ordering my Epson 4000, I about had a heart attack when I was told that it wouldn't feed anything narrower than 10" but fortunately that turned out to be untrue after changing one of the settings on the printer as I have no problems feeding/printing on 7x10" cardstock (5x7" when folded) feeding the narrow end (7") leading--I didn't want to feed the cardstock via the 10" edge as the Epson 4000 (like many of the wide-format printers) has a requirement of .56" trailing margin (so the paper will feed properly at the end of the sheet). This is unlikely to be an issue with the 13" wide printers.

In terms of printing on both sides, you will probably find that it's a bit tedious because, as far as I know, most photo inkjet printers are not duplex so you will probably find that it's best to do one print run where you print all of one side and then do a second print run printing the second side.


>>I'll definitely look into those inkjets. Since they are photo printers, I'm assuming that they are not really the appropriate choice for the other types of usage I'm thinking, which brings me back to buying two printers.

It's not so much that an inkjet is inappropriate in terms of print quality but more the cost of inkjet ink/cartridges because, in general, laser toner is probably more cost effective but I'm not sure that's the case for color lasers. Additionally, depending on the inkjet, it might be worth looking into both good quality 3rd party inkjet inks and/or a continuous ink system. Inksupply.com has a good rep for 3rd party inks for a number of different inkjet makers--Epson, Canon, HP, etc. and they also sell continuous ink systems for a number of different inkjet makers along with refill kits also...


>>Thanks!

You're welcome...


Terrie
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