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Old 09-20-2009, 09:24 AM   #1
Richard Waller
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Default The web has changed the world

The UK Daily Telegraph (Saturday 19 Sept) names 50 ways that the Internet has changed our lives. Watching TV together (iPlayer etc). Books of reference. Reading telegrams at weddings. Enforceable copyright. Privacy (Twitter, Facebook et al). Trust in Nigerian businessmen (Spam).

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technolog...-internet.html

   
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Old 09-20-2009, 01:55 PM   #2
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Richard:
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The . . . Daily Telegraph . . . names 50 ways that the Internet has changed our lives
It may have affected journalists' lives, but I doubt if the Web has changed your life or mine; the journalist lists fifty utterly trivial things that none can take seriously. 'Reading telegrams at weddings', for instance, has never been anyone's idea of entertainment. There was a time when the Daily Telegraph was an essential purchase (because of the job adverts), but now . . .

   
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Old 09-21-2009, 12:34 AM   #3
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I started the thread here Welcome to the Off-Line world which listed the things that had changed for me and which threw me when I couldn't surf. Other things have made changes too I guess; the top of my list is the overwhelming importance now of the motor car.

   
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Old 09-21-2009, 11:18 AM   #4
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I can't agree with you Michael. I consider the Internet every bit as important an invention as television. It is a communcation tool that has enabled me to stop having a telephone, for one. Grandparents now see photos of distant grandchildren within hours of an activity ... is that utterly trivial?

Information is now far more free. I can search the Internet for medical information that once required a visit to a doctor or pharmacist. Just today I learned that there is an up coming pair of movies on the Hobbit. Trivial to you, but important to me, I assure you.

I can now communicate with people who are of the same interests as me. I doubt there is anyone in my city of 80,000 who has an interest in typography as strong as mine. But thanks to the Internet I can join with the folk here and at typophile on a daily basis.

To me it is much more than trivial.
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Old 09-21-2009, 11:45 AM   #5
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Michael,

You could call me a poster-boy for how the internet can change lives. It's enabled me to sell and support my software all around the planet and to do custom programming/consulting for clients all over the US and in Europe.

I can work odd hours if I choose (and I do) because hardly anyone expects to be able to call and reach me instantly or to get instant replies to their emails.

My office can be anywhere I put the laptop and as long as I can find an internet connection every so often, I can work anywhere in the world.

   
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Old 09-21-2009, 11:50 AM   #6
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Don:
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I consider the Internet every bit as important an invention as television
That is statement I agree with: it's just about as important as television, which, you must admit, is mostly trivial.

   
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Last edited by Franca; 09-21-2009 at 01:16 PM. Reason: Fixed quote code, is all. :)
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Old 09-21-2009, 11:58 AM   #7
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Steve:
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You could call me a poster-boy for how the internet can change lives
If I knew what a poster-boy is I would probably agree that your life may have been changed; but none of the things that you mention are in the Daily Telegraph's list. And you might have styled your work consultancy: consultants were very important when I started work—and often very rich too.

   
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Old 09-21-2009, 02:20 PM   #8
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The article, by example, would seem to indicate that all attempts to proofread for internet publishing have been abandoned. It also clearly demonstrates the particular inadequacies of computer spell checkers. (Not that anyone here would consider the computer capable of proper proofreading or rely entirely on spell checkers for the task. )

   
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Old 09-21-2009, 04:37 PM   #9
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rely entirely on spell checkers for the task
Have Merlin et al. really been sacked, or did you mean spelling checkers? (I'm feeling grumpy because your statement about proofreading led me to re-read the whole article again, just to see if I could find anything misspelt—all I found was one erronous hyphen, which should have been an en-dash.)

   
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Old 09-21-2009, 07:04 PM   #10
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Michael:

There is no need to reread the entire article. Before the author even reaches his second item in the list of fifty, he has already made five mistakes:
The internet is no respecter of reputations: innocent people have seen their lives ruined by viral clips distributed on the same World Wide Web used by activists to highlight injustices and bring down oppressive regimes [missing period here]

Below we have compiled - [erroneous hyphen] in no particular order - [companion erroneous hyphen] 50 things that are in the process of being killed off by the web, from products and business models to life experiences and habits. We've also thrown in a few things that have suffered [missing word, 'at'?] the hands of other modern networking gadgets, specifically mobile phones and GPS systems.

Do you agree with our selections? What other examples can you think of? Please post your comments on the bottom of the story – [a bit difficult to see the difference here in the forum but it was clearly and correctly an en dash in the article] we hope [missing word, 'to'?] include the best suggestions in a fuller list.

1) The art of polite disagreement
While the inane spats of YouTube commencers [I assume he meant 'commenters'?] may not be representative, the internet has certainly sharpened the tone of debate. The most raucous sections of the blogworld seem incapable of accepting sincerely held differences of opinion; all opponents must have "agendas".
I might also quibble with 'on the bottom of the story', but perhaps that is British usage. Here in the U.S. we would say, 'at the bottom of the story'.

If you like, I will proofread the rest of the article to see if there are any more, but I think this provides a sufficient number of errors to prove my point.

I was not referring to human 'spelling checkers'. 'Spell checkers' may be grammatically incorrect but I don't recall using any computer application that refers to them as 'spelling checkers'. OpenOffice, in fact, calls it 'Spellchecker', which you may or may not find even more egregious. Whatever you call them, they will not find missing words, nor will they find typos in words that are correctly spelled but mean something other than what the writer intended. I am fairly certain no human spelling checker laid eyes on that article before it was published on the Web. Perhaps proofreading should be added to the list of things that are being killed by the internet.

   
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Last edited by Franca; 09-21-2009 at 11:26 PM. Reason: Edited for grammar and clarity
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