DTP


 
Lively discussions on the graphic arts and publishing — in print or on the web


Go Back   Desktop Publishing Forum > General Discussions > Photography

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-25-2009, 06:00 PM   #11
BobRoosth
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Los Angeles, Ca.
Posts: 933
Default

My favorite site for camera information is http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/

Happy hunting.
BobRoosth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2009, 04:31 PM   #12
Ronald
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Great Plains, USA
Posts: 250
Default

I'm still looking at cameras based largely on what you folks have said. Choosing what camera type is hazy: I'm thinking either DSLR or bridge? But from my reading, bridge cameras don't allow interchangeable lenses while DSLRs do. Then again, other than an occasional fishbowl effect or what have you, maybe I wouldn't need too many lenses if I had a strong enough zoom to begin with?

So far I'm eying a Canon G6 and Panasonic Lumix G1 as noted by Kathleen. It looks like I can get the Canon pretty cheap while the latter is considerably newer and more expensive, which I'm fine with. I'm also comfortable with refurbished models.

Kathleen mentioned getting large sensors, which would mean a high megapixel rate. But what would that be, 12mp and up? I'm also keeping an eye out for tilt and swivel LCD panels, good optical zoom, and shutter lag as mentioned by other forum members.

Is it possible to have a camera that, without a long shutter lag, takes acceptable photos under dark/dim lighting that won't cause blur? There could be situations were I'd want to be low key and not use flash.
Ronald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 01:31 AM   #13
Benwiggy
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: London
Posts: 451
Default

My advise is to buy only from a company that made "traditional" cameras, e.g. Canon, Ricoh, Olympus, Nikon, Fuji; rather than an electronics/consumer company that has a line in cameras.

It may be true that the electronic and optical components are the same, but for me it's the experience and thought behind it all.
Benwiggy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 01:40 PM   #14
terrie
Staff
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,944
Default

Quote:
ronald: Is it possible to have a camera that, without a long shutter lag, takes acceptable photos under dark/dim lighting that won't cause blur? There could be situations were I'd want to be low key and not use flash.
Should be possible but the only way you might be able to find out before buying is to spend time in camera-review-hell in which one becomes glassy-eyed and symptoms of the dread disease of paralysis-by-analysis begin to appear...'-}}

When I was in this state, I found steve's digicams reviews to be very helpful--although it can lead to the above mentioned disease...'-}}

Personally, having owned/used SLRs, I leaned toward the DSLRs and when I had the money, I ordered a Canon Rebel Xt (350D) body only along with a telephoto lens--rather than the standard body plus standard lens combo because it's less expensive in the long run and you get the lens(es) you would really use. I ordered from buydig.com and was pleased with their website's ease of use (very easy to narrow down choices and check prices and options), their pricing and service.

That said, do check out refurbs--my first digital camera (Olympus C-40) was a refurb--and I'd recommend refurbdepot.com as I've ordered a number of things from them (the camera and a couple of different refurb printers). Use their "Category Search" (digital cameras) and "Company Search" (Canon, for example) if you know the brand you want or just the "Category Search" if you want to see all the digital cameras they have...

For example, they are selling the Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSi body only (12.2-Megapixel CMOS, 3.0" LCD Monitor, Live View Function, 3.5 fps Continuous Shooting, High Sensitivity (ISO 1600), Picture Style Settings--and there is a rather full feature/tech specs description on the page) for $489.95 and then you could buy whichever lens you wanted from buydig.com or someplace else...

Hope that helps...

Terrie
terrie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 01:55 PM   #15
Steve Rindsberg
Staff
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 6,742
Default

Some of the bridge cameras offer interchangeable lenses (but it's not the usual thing).
The Lumix cameras have good quality lenses and some have extraordinarily long zoom ranges (but can have rather small image sensors, so the image quality won't be as good as a DSLR (which usually have larger sensors) will give you.

Don't confuse size of sensors with megapixels. All things being equal, a larger sensor will give you a better image than a smaller sensor at the same number of megapixels. But there are cameras that have small sensors but deliver large numbers of pixels. Personally, I'd rather have a higher quality but lower resolution image. My older teenycam (Pentax Optio S) delivers better images than the much higher resolution Lumix I've got, but the Lumix has a much wider zoom range, image stabilization and a lot of other features that make it more versatile.

And by shutter lag, do you mean the delay between pressing the shutter and actually taking the picture, or just long shutter-open times?

If the latter, look for good image sensor performance at higher "film" speeds. Some of the newer Nikon DSLRs seem to be absolute killers in this area.

   
__________________
Steve Rindsberg
====================
www.pptfaq.com
www.pptools.com
and stuff
Steve Rindsberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 02:03 PM   #16
Howard Allen
Member
 
Howard Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 824
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronald View Post
Is it possible to have a camera that, without a long shutter lag, takes acceptable photos under dark/dim lighting that won't cause blur? There could be situations were I'd want to be low key and not use flash.
Depends: do you want to have your cake, or eat it?

All cameras--whether film or digital--work by gathering light. There are only so many ways of gathering more light:

1) Expose the sensor/film longer (shutter speed)
2) Use a more sensitive sensor/film (ISO "speed")
3) Use a bigger "pipeline" (i.e. wider lens aperture)
4) Introduce more light (flash)

That's about it. Good DSLRs will give you the ability to manipulate all four variables--multiple shutter speeds; multiple ISO sensitivity settings; interchangeable lenses (lenses are available in different "speeds", which means "maximum light-gathering ability": 50mm--or equivalent--standard lenses may be available in different maximum apertures--f1.2, f1.4, f1.8, f2.0 etc., the smaller the number the bigger the aperture, and the higher the price). You will also be able to use more powerful flash units.

The best combination of all four variables will depend on the situation. With point-and-shoot cameras you may be stuck with a single not-very-fast lens and no (or a smaller range of) ISO settings, which are two variables you want to maximize for lurking under the radar in dimly-lit environments.

   
__________________
Howard

OSX 10.10.5
Howard Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2009, 09:54 AM   #17
Ronald
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Great Plains, USA
Posts: 250
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard Allen View Post
Depends: do you want to have your cake, or eat it?
Heheh. Good point. Thank you for the in-depth perspective.

A lot of this information is so overwhelming, I'm literally just looking at the specific cameras you guys say you bought/own and seeing how high a rating they have - like right now I'm eying Terrie's Canon Rebel Xt.

I'm pretty confident DSLR is the way to go. And now I know to focus more on sensor size than megapixels, but by reading product specs, I still can't tell what a "large" sensor size would be. I see the aforementioned Rebel Xt has a "CMOS sensor."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
By shutter lag, do you mean the delay between pressing the shutter and actually taking the picture, or just long shutter-open times?
Hugh Wyn Griffith mentioned it earlier in this thread: "Watch for shutter lag especially on non-dSLR cameras since it can be unpleasantly long and make action pictures difficult."

I, too, regard picture quality over resolution.
Ronald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2009, 10:33 AM   #18
Steve Rindsberg
Staff
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 6,742
Default

DPReview.com gives you the sensor size, number of pixels and pixel density (number of pixels per square cm of sensor).

For example, my Lumix at 7+ megapixels is 29 MP/cm²
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/spec...nic_dmctz3.asp

The Nikon D700 (not mine, alas) at 12+ megapixels is 1.4 MP/cm²
Roughly 50% more pixels but spread over a MUCH larger sensor ... in other words, the lower the pixel density, the better the image (again, all other factors being equal ... which they won't be, of course!)

And about lag ... the DSLR will almost inevitably be better than smaller cameras. Some of them take so long to focus that you press the shutter, the subject's gone out to dinner, had a nice coffee afterwards, perhaps a brandy, taken a stroll around the square and .... click. The silly thing's finally taken a picture.

But some of the non-DSLRs are much snappier than others. It's no DSLR but the Lumix mentioned above is bearable. That's another reason I chose it over others.

If you burrow through several pages of the full reviews, you'll find that DPReview gives shutter lag test results. The numbers themselves won't be too useful but if you look up the results for a couple of cameras you've handled, it should give you a sense of what's good and what's not.

   
__________________
Steve Rindsberg
====================
www.pptfaq.com
www.pptools.com
and stuff
Steve Rindsberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2010, 09:40 AM   #19
dianizon
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 2
Default Love my new Canon G11

I needed a new camera, as my HP broke in Feb while on vac. It was a great point and shoot for almost 5 yrs. I was looking into DSLR also because I'm nearing retirement and do design work in Illustrator, InDesign and Photoshop. I would like to start taking higher quality pics as I plan on travelling some. Started checking dpreview.com last Nov and decided the Canon G11 was for me.


It's a point and shoot if I want it to be, also can buy lenses and filters when I learn more about them. And has ability to shoot raw alongside .jpg. Bought it 3wks ago from NewEgg for under $500. Hubby asked why I didn't buy another pocket camera, well it would fit in a large pocket for now, or pouch. I told him this is my retirement camera, and now he can buy me accessories for gifts in the future!! I'm loving it. Takes excellent pics and is very easy to use. Has settings a pro could use better, but I'll learn.
dianizon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2010, 04:16 PM   #20
terrie
Staff
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 8,944
Default

Quote:
dianizon: I told him this is my retirement camera, and now he can buy me accessories for gifts in the future!!
LOL!!! Sounds like a nice camera...

Terrie
terrie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Buying a bi-platform external HD marlene Hardware & Gadgets 35 12-21-2008 08:43 AM
Buying spree ktinkel Hardware & Gadgets 2 08-28-2008 06:02 PM
Buying on eBay ktinkel Business Matters 38 05-05-2008 01:26 PM
Buying from Amazon Bo Aakerstrom Software 12 10-18-2007 05:16 PM
Buying a Font dthomsen8 Web Site Building & Maintenance 4 02-15-2006 01:50 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Contents copyright 2004–2014 Desktop Publishing Forum and its members.