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Old 06-22-2009, 05:26 AM   #1
TooLoose_LeTrek
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Default What Resolution is best for printing?

I am about to embark on assembling my music book, now that I have the software issue resolved, and need to know what is the best resolution for images I'll use. My music notation program exports as TIFF files and I have a number of options for the resolution, up to about 1200 I think. The book is entirely B&W. Would say 300 dpi be sufficient?

Thanks.
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Old 06-22-2009, 06:32 AM   #2
Steve Rindsberg
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First, find the resolution at which the book will be printed, along with the linescreen (your printer can tell you this).

Are your music notation files pure B/W or grayscale? I'd assume the former but you know what they say about acting on one's assumptions.

   
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Old 06-22-2009, 06:34 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TooLoose_LeTrek View Post
I am about to embark on assembling my music book, now that I have the software issue resolved, and need to know what is the best resolution for images I'll use. My music notation program exports as TIFF files and I have a number of options for the resolution, up to about 1200 I think. The book is entirely B&W. Would say 300 dpi be sufficient?
300 dpi is commonly recommended for photos and other continuous-tone images. For line art, especially if they are fine lines or curves (as musical notation is likely to have), use 1200.

This assumes you are not enlarging the art after you create it (if you have a choice, output at larger size than needed for printing, then reduce to the desired print size at 1200 dpi).

   
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Old 06-23-2009, 12:51 AM   #4
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You have said elsewhere that you use Finale. That can export EPS files, which are vector data. Vector data is resolution independent, meaning that it displays the same at ANY size.
EPS files are much smaller (in Kb) than 1200dpi TIFFs, and still look sharper, crisper and cleaner when printed.
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Old 06-23-2009, 06:27 AM   #5
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You have said elsewhere that you use Finale. That can export EPS files, which are vector data. Vector data is resolution independent, meaning that it displays the same at ANY size.
EPS files are much smaller (in Kb) than 1200dpi TIFFs, and still look sharper, crisper and cleaner when printed.
Assuming that the EPS are not just TIFFs in an EPS wrapper, absolutely.

Easy enough to test ... export as both TIF and EPS. If the resulting files are roughly the same size, it's probably TIF wrapped in EPS. Better to use the TIF instead. If the EPS is notably smaller, then ...

IF the final printing process uses PostScript, use the EPS. The printer can advise on that.

Or if you're making PDFs using Acrobat or GhostScript or the like and handing the PDFs to the printer, use the EPS.

   
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Old 06-23-2009, 07:10 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwiggy View Post
You have said elsewhere that you use Finale. That can export EPS files, which are vector data. Vector data is resolution independent, meaning that it displays the same at ANY size.
EPS files are much smaller (in Kb) than 1200dpi TIFFs, and still look sharper, crisper and cleaner when printed.
Vector EPSes would sure beat 1200 dpi TIFFs. I thought he had to make bitmaps.

   
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Old 12-28-2009, 10:58 AM   #7
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Yikes, it's moi, returned from the ether. Christmas season will do that!

This is a reasonable thread to post this thing, which has been driving me insane for almost 3 years.

In my day job, magazine and PR people routinely request that photos be submitted at 300 dpi. I ask "For what final size?" because I know that a 600x800 photo at 300 dpi will be 2x2.67" at 300 dpi and if they make it 7.5x10 it'll be 80 dpi.

They all get irritated at me and say "It just needs to be 300 dpi."

And when I look at a file's properties in the folder, it does list horiz & vertical res, as well as dimensions.

It's giving me a headache to even think about this. I hate cluelessness, y'know?

So what am I missing?

   
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Old 12-28-2009, 11:57 AM   #8
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You can't argue with cluelessness.
They've been told 300dpi, they're going to insist on 300dpi.
Bludgeoning them with reason will not help you here.

So send them 300dpi images.
48" oughta do it.

   
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Old 12-28-2009, 12:02 PM   #9
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Hi Steve!

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Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
So send them 300dpi images.
48" oughta do it.
But but but, what's up with what the file system shows? It's saying 300 dpi; what is that talking about??

I'm sure I've missed something somewhere along the line. It might be a WRONG something, but I'd still like to know.

   
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Old 12-28-2009, 12:03 PM   #10
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My best guess is that they do not understand the pixels v inches relationship, and are just reporting what they have heard. Because it makes them nervous, they snap at you.

How do they generally turn out (assuming you get to see the printed copy afterwards)?

   
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