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Old 05-01-2009, 12:28 PM   #1
Susie
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Default Changing a Word In a Quote

I know I should remember this, but what word is used to indicate that I have changed one word in a quote for clarity?

   
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Old 05-01-2009, 04:55 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Susie View Post
I know I should remember this, but what word is used to indicate that I have changed one word in a quote for clarity?
Not sure I understand.

Normally, if a word is ambiguous or exotic or whatever, you could enclose a more understandable term in square brackets. If that seems awkward you could append a note, explaining.

Not sure if there is a word to explain this, but I might be missing your point.

   
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Old 05-01-2009, 05:05 PM   #3
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If you change a word in a quote it is no longer a quote. In news media, announcers usually say, And I quote,"........................................... ........", end of quote.
In that case the exact quote is verbatim. If there is to be a change, the announcer states his change and explains the adjustment.
In literature Kathleen's explanation is the rule but it is permitted to italicise the original word in question and place an asterisk next to it, then to put a footnote stating that the italics are the author's and then explaining your alternate meaning for the word.
But realise that as soon as you change just one or more than one words in a quote, it is no longer a quote.
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Old 05-01-2009, 05:19 PM   #4
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Well, this is for the newsletter I do at work. First the article I'm using comes from a publication that is there for the purpose of passing on to our readers. I'm putting in an article, but it will be more clear for our purposes if I change the wording "Our district participates in scheduling" to "our groups participate..."

   
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Old 05-01-2009, 05:22 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Beloved View Post
But realise that as soon as you change just one or more than one words in a quote, it is no longer a quote.
I understand, but in this case, it is one word in one sentence in an article that I want to change. The whole article goes into the newsletter (with permission, of course).

   
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Old 05-01-2009, 05:26 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Susie View Post
Well, this is for the newsletter I do at work. First the article I'm using comes from a publication that is there for the purpose of passing on to our readers. I'm putting in an article, but it will be more clear for our purposes if I change the wording "Our district participates in scheduling" to "our groups participate..."
Ah. I get it.

This would be an issue of avoiding confusion or ambiguity, I think. One approach would be to write what you want before beginning the quoted part:

Our groups participate “in scheduling …” and so on.

If that is too cumbersome, consider not quoting at all — just say the same thing your way. Quotes are important when misquoting might cause a problem, but ordinary statements of fact do not usually need to be quoted at all. You can always say something like “The king wants us to tell you that blah, blah, blah” and avoid quoting anything.

Any help?

   
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Old 05-01-2009, 06:02 PM   #7
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If that is too cumbersome, consider not quoting at all — just say the same thing your way.

I agree with this advice. Usually when you change something, the whole format of expression is affected, because of a change in intention, even a small change. Sometimes I am in the same position if I rewrite a sentence during publishing, or if a proof reader makes a suggestion, which I accept.
Then it is better to consider the essence and rewrite the sentence from the new perspective, rather than try to move a heavy old train to new high-rail track.
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Old 05-02-2009, 12:21 AM   #8
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Drifting slightly, there is a convention that if the quote has spelling or verbal funnies you put in (sic) a Latin word meaning "thus", "so", "as such", or "in such a manner". which could also be short for 'doesn't this man's spelling make you sick <g>'.

   
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Old 05-02-2009, 12:46 AM   #9
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Or you could just paraphrase what someone said or wrote, at least Wikipedia's definition implies that.

   
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Old 05-02-2009, 07:37 AM   #10
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Susie:
Quote:
I have changed one word in a quote for clarity?
One solution is to ignore that what you're putting in quotation marks is not exactly a verbatim report. Newspapers (and others) freguently put remarks actually expressed in a foreign language but quoted in the vernacular—probably by a professional interpreter—between quotation marks. Another (more honest) solution is to put 'he said that . . .' and follow it by a nearly verbatim report, using nearly all his actual words.

   
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