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Old 10-01-2008, 10:48 AM   #1
livewire
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Default Settings for live shows?

Hi all!

I recently invested in a Samsung S1060, since I have wanted a good camera for so so long!

I mostly use my cameras for live shots at gigs etc. but I can't seem to get the settings right, my pictures always come out blurred. I have taken some great videos (even the sound is great on this camera btw) but my still shots are dire unless the subject is completely still!

I have followed the cameras instructions for taking pictures in low light etc but it doesn't make much difference. Any ideas?

Thanks.
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Old 10-01-2008, 01:47 PM   #2
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You probably need a tripod and remote to avoid movement of the camera during the long period the shutter is open in low light situations.

   
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Old 10-01-2008, 02:38 PM   #3
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Well in a live concert situation that's not really appropriate.
I think it's just a case of finding the right settings. I know someone with basically the same camera but the 8MP version (mine is 10MP) and her pictures turn out great.
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Old 10-01-2008, 02:52 PM   #4
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Quote:
livewire: I have followed the cameras instructions for taking pictures in low light etc but it doesn't make much difference. Any ideas?
What do you have the camera's iso setting set to when you are shooting in low light?

What f-stop are you using?

Some people can hold a camera steady at low shutter speeds and some can't--might explain why your friend's images are sharper than yours...

You might take a look a monopods rather than a tripod...

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Old 10-01-2008, 03:54 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terrie View Post
What do you have the camera's iso setting set to when you are shooting in low light?

What f-stop are you using?

Some people can hold a camera steady at low shutter speeds and some can't--might explain why your friend's images are sharper than yours...

You might take a look a monopods rather than a tripod...

Terrie
The ISO can be between 50 ans 1600, I had it set at 100 which produced great quality videos but not pictures.

The f-stop was 4.9.

I think a quicker shutter speed might help, especially when the subject is moving, how do I change that?

Thanks.
Chloe.
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Old 10-01-2008, 04:16 PM   #6
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livewire: The ISO can be between 50 ans 1600, I had it set at 100 which produced great quality videos but not pictures.
Well...no wonder you're having problems...'-}}

Kick that sucker up to 1600--you will get more "noise" but you can play with that in processing.

You might experiment with the higher ISO setting by taking the same shot in a room that will have similar lighting to the places you've been shooting. Shoot at 1600, then set the ISO down to the next lowest ISO setting (probably 800) and shoot the same scene. Repeat for each lower ISO setting until you get down to 100--you already know what 100 will give you.

Needless to say...you can do the same thing working up the ISO settings if that's easier but the key is shooting the same image in the same low-light so that you have something you can compare.

Then take a look at each shot using whatever imaging software you have and see which one works best. You want to get the speed you need with the least amount of digital noise and the higher the ISO, the more noise.


>>The f-stop was 4.9.

Is that as open an f-stop as you can go? Open your lens up as wide as it will go--your depth of field (what's in focus) will be narrower but you'll gain more light...


>>I think a quicker shutter speed might help, especially when the subject is moving, how do I change that?

You need to look in your book--each camera is different and your shutter speed is generally determined by your f-stop.

Most cameras allow you to select:

1. Shutter-Priority - you select the shutter speed and the camera determines the appropriate lens f-stop.

2. Aperture-Priority - you select your f-stop and the camera determines the shutter speed.

Personally, I use Aperture-Priority because I want to select my own f-stop as this allows me to play with the depth of field more easily. For low-light shots, I think Aperture-Priority is better--open your lens wide and then let the system determine the shutter speed.

The best way to determine what will work for you is to set up a series of test shots as I described above--adding playing with both the aperture and shutter setting.

Take notes!!! '-}}

Terrie
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Old 10-01-2008, 05:55 PM   #7
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How are the pictures blurred? The first thing you need to do is assess what the problem is. There could be (at least) 3 different things going on here:

1) Focus: some cameras with autofocus don't perform as well in low-light situations. You might have to use manual focusing, if that's available. There are other issues with autofocus, as well. Some cameras allow you to specify different points on the viewfinder screen as the "target" for the autofocus. If you inadvertently set the target point to the right side of the screen, say, then you might be aiming at a subject in the centre of the screen, but the autofocus is focusing on the right side of the screen, throwing your central subject out of focus. (I've done this myself, fiddling with the controls without realizing it.) Check your user manual.

2) Subject movement: this is the problem you're going to have the most success at fixing with higher ISO settings and faster shutter speeds. In this case, you should notice that stationary objects (stuff hanging on the walls, etc.) are sharp in the picture, but animated objects (people moving on stage?) will be blurry.

3) Camera movement: while higher ISO settings/shutter speeds will help somewhat with this problem, if your camera is swinging around or shaking, there's not much room for improvement until you practice holding the camera still (or use a tripod, though that probably isn't practical in the situations you're describing). In this case, everything in the picture will be blurry, including stationary objects.

   
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Old 10-01-2008, 07:59 PM   #8
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Unless the lighting is WAY bright, 100 won't be adequate.

Try bumping it up to 1600, take some photos round the house at low light levels and see if the noise gets really obnoxious. Lower the ISO until you arrive at something that produces acceptable noise levels.

Check to see if the camera offers image stabilization. If so, turn it up to the max.

Is everything blurry or is the focus off? If the latter, force the camera to prefocus on the main subject, lock onto that, then compose.

   
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Old 10-02-2008, 12:39 AM   #9
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Thank you for your advice everyone, I will try your ideas!

I have an event Friday I'm supposed to take photos at (not a concert but an event in my student union) so I will do some work on improving my shots and test it out Friday night!

Thank you all for taking the time to help me out.
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Old 10-02-2008, 12:59 AM   #10
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Take a look at this Guest blog over at Scott Kelby's site, might give you some pointers. THREE SONGS, NO FLASH

   
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