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Old 09-29-2008, 04:51 PM   #1
Howard Allen
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Default NOT [edible] cookies

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Originally Posted by terrie View Post
I love Hydrox cookes!!! Much bettter than (ugh) Oreos...'-}}
I've never heard of Hydrox cookies--evidently they're not sold in Canada, and they don't advertise on TV. But how on earth did they come up with a name like that? Something only a chemist could love--sounds like a caustic cleaning product from Monsanto. I think I'd be repelled if I saw a package of cookies labelled "Hydrox" on my store shelf!

   
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Old 09-30-2008, 02:06 PM   #2
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Deep sea divers? That'd be heliox rather than hydrox, no?

   
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Old 09-30-2008, 02:17 PM   #3
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Deep sea divers? That'd be heliox rather than hydrox, no?
That I do not know. I had read that the same word applies to some deep sea diving inhalant — but believe me when I tell you that I know from nothin’ when it comes to that sort of sport! <g>

This semi-explanation comes from the Wall Street Journal:
The Hydrox name came from combining the words hydrogen and oxygen, which Sunshine executives thought evoked purity.

   
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Old 09-30-2008, 03:45 PM   #4
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Steve:

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Deep sea divers? That'd be heliox rather than hydrox, no?
Yes, if it refers to a mixture of helium and oxygen instead of nitrogen and oxygen (to avoid the bends, which can cripple or kill divers that are depressurized too quickly).

   
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Old 10-01-2008, 11:52 AM   #5
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Steve:

Yes, if it refers to a mixture of helium and oxygen instead of nitrogen and oxygen (to avoid the bends, which can cripple or kill divers that are depressurized too quickly).
Right ... but as far as I know, they don't use a hydrogen+oxygen mixture. That might be a bit too exciting. The other reason (and possibly the more compelling one) for avoiding nitrogen at extreme depths is the nitrogen narcosis. Sensitivity to it varies from one person to the next, but it can make a diver drunk and derail rational thinking.

In extreme cases, people have succumbed to it, gotten the impression that their equipment was an unnecessary encumbrance and thrown it away, tank, regulator and all, and headed merrily for the bottom. And stayed there.

And to keep it on topic ... their Hydrox cookies got all soggy.

   
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Old 10-01-2008, 02:12 PM   #6
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Steve:

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The other reason (and possibly the more compelling one) for avoiding nitrogen at extreme depths is the nitrogen narcosis. Sensitivity to it varies from one person to the next, but it can make a diver drunk and derail rational thinking.
I was thinking more of professional divers that work in pressured suits: they have to be depressurized in slow stages, but they usually know which way is 'up'. Helium may be more an American thing (I forget why helium was available in quantity in America; hence the blimps, used a long time ago by the US Coastguard).

   
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Old 10-01-2008, 08:20 PM   #7
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Sport divers are supposed to plan their dives so that they never require decompression stops, but learn when and why they might be needed.

Some gung-ho types, including a guy I used to dive with occasionally, strap on double or triple tanks and leave add'l tanks suspended at the decompression stops, all so they can go deeper and stay down longer.

There are cheaper, faster and more comfortable ways to kill or maim oneself, is the way I see it. But it's not just the folks in pressurized suits who need to do decompression stops.

Helium vs Hydrogen? I don't know why He would have been available in quantity here (interesting question; thread drift here we go), but the main reason for using it in blimps, I'd think, was that it doesn't go boom the way hydrogen does.

Apparently argon, neon and our friend hyrdrogen are all used experimentally. The main breathing mixtures are heliox (helium/oxygen); nitrox (nitrogen/oxygen ... basically air but with a higher percentage of oxygen than normal); and Trimix (heliox with a small amount of nitrogen added).

It all boils down to the fact that we weren't built for high pressure environments. We live on oxygen but need it "diluted" with other gases because it becomes toxic at high pressures. Nitrogen and the other substitutes all have their drawbacks. And of course helium makes us sound like Donald Duck.

   
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Old 10-01-2008, 08:29 PM   #8
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This explains a bit about where He comes from. It's part of some natural gas deposits, and it seems that you were right about the source. It's mostly here in the US.

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/2216/FAQ.html

WAY more than any twelve of us wants to know:

http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pu...modity/helium/

   
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Old 10-02-2008, 01:12 AM   #9
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Howard - you are so right about the deep non-appeal of the name!

I wonder if it is an elaborate pun. Hydrox = hydrogen and oxygen = water = water biscuits - a plain cracker for cheese (or drunken dry biscuit-eating competitions by students) in the UK
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Old 10-02-2008, 01:41 AM   #10
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I hope it's as innocent as that. The first thing that popped into my head is sodium hydroxide (=lye/caustic soda/drain cleaner) which would make me a bit apprehensive about biting into that soft, white, pasty filling!

   
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