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Old 07-08-2008, 11:09 AM   #1
rbb
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Default 4 C job but file uses pantone + cmyk

What is the best way to convert to cmyk?
Does someone recommend going in to the ink manager and turning on

All Spots to Process?

What about in the case of using Quark?

Last edited by rbb; 07-09-2008 at 01:31 PM.
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Old 07-09-2008, 12:54 PM   #2
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Definitely don't use Quark for this: bound to mess it up.

I'd use the ink mangler settings that you found in InDesign. If that doesn't work, you could try converting the colours to your preferred destination ICC profile, which will convert the spots to process (actually, you could export the file to a new PDF using this last method, and that should give you a CMYK file.)

   
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Old 07-09-2008, 01:22 PM   #3
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Thanks, Ink manager's the way to go. Just looking for the most quick and efficient way. Just asked because at times you will get a file/layout done by someone else where they've used a mix of process and spot colors. Annoying to replace the cmyk equivalent of the Pantone...what if done in Quark though?? anyone??



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Definitely don't use Quark for this: bound to mess it up.

I'd use the ink mangler settings that you found in InDesign. If that doesn't work, you could try converting the colours to your preferred destination ICC profile, which will convert the spots to process (actually, you could export the file to a new PDF using this last method, and that should give you a CMYK file.)
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Old 07-09-2008, 02:05 PM   #4
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What is the best way to convert to cmyk?
Does someone recommend going in to the ink manager and turning on

All Spots to Process?
How come you are converting the job to CMYK? The client may want the Pantone colors, no? (There is no perfect match in CMYK for many or most of the colors, and some clients want them at any cost.)

Just curious.

   
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Old 07-09-2008, 02:47 PM   #5
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what if done in Quark though??
You can print separations from Quark and choose to convert spots to process, but if the document is InDesign, pretty sure it won't open in Quark.

   
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Old 07-10-2008, 10:03 AM   #6
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In Quark you can turn spot colours into process colours by editing in the colour palette. But however if the spot colour in the colour palette has been placed there by importing a graphic with that spot colour you can turn it into a process colour but there's no guarantee that the colour split will be accurate. You have to go back to the original graphic and convert the spot into process. Then update the graphic in Quark.

Once you're in the colour palette edit mode, there's a drop down menu which you can use to see spot colour, colour not used in document etc.

In the Indesign colour palette I hate the use of "paper" instead of "white" after all paper can be any colour.
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Old 07-10-2008, 12:38 PM   #7
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In the Indesign colour palette I hate the use of "paper" instead of "white" after all paper can be any colour.
That is the point. True white scarcely exists in the real world, especially in papers. That notation reminds you that the paper color will affect all the colors you spec. It is a much more useful (and accurate) term than “white.”

That was inherited from PageMaker’s feature set.

   
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Old 07-10-2008, 01:33 PM   #8
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As KT said, this is actually quite useful - particularly when you're printing onto coloured stock, where you can set the paper colour to look like the, er, paper colour.

   
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Old 07-25-2008, 03:44 PM   #9
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Kathleen
Designers send files which have been quoted CMYK to us wiith lots of spot (PMS) colours in - What they dont understand is that when they let a printer convert spot (PMS) to CMYK it deepends what Pantone Library is set up in his rip
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Old 07-25-2008, 05:51 PM   #10
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Designers send files which have been quoted CMYK to us wiith lots of spot (PMS) colours in - What they dont understand is that when they let a printer convert spot (PMS) to CMYK it deepends what Pantone Library is set up in his rip
Hey — howdy!

Don’t designers ever discuss their jobs with the printer in advance of completing and sending the files?

   
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