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Old 03-20-2008, 04:13 PM   #8
dthomsen8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel View Post
It allows web developers to use CSS code (@font-face) that calls for download of a font to be used on a page. An article by Hakon Lie at A List Apart discusses it, taking an optimistic view.

...

How would you like having @font-face? (Anyway, guess you can, now, with Safari.
I suspected that I wouldn't care, and I don't. Thanks for the explanation, but it does raise questions.

What happens when there is a @font-face in the CSS, but the browser doesn't recognize it? Is there a default font?

It seems reasonable to expect the primary reason to use it would be to have a fancy or otherwise unusual display font displayed, just as the web developer would like the page to appear. Fine, but if most browsers don't support it, there isn't much of a point.

I don't know how I would oppose this concept, but I might do so. New ideas are not always good ideas.
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