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Old 03-21-2005, 01:48 PM   #1
ktinkel
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Default Microsoft's new font collection

The Poynter online site has a preview of six new fonts that will ship with Longhorn, the next major revision of Windows. You can read a bit about them and view most of the faces at this Poynter web site link.

There is also a discussion of the fonts on Typophile.com — some discussion of why these fonts look so similar, among other things, by John Hudson, one of the designers. (You may have to register to read there; not sure.)

Some points about them: They are designed for Microsoft’s ClearType technology, so it appears that Mac, Linux, and other non-users of Windows will not be able to use these fonts. (Unless, of course, MS makes OT versions available somehow.) But over time, all Windows users will have them, including many web site developers; sounds messy to me.

The font names all begin with C — Calibri (sans; by Luc(as) de Groot), Cambria (serif; Jelle Bosma), Candara (sans; Gary Munch), Consolas (mono-width; de Groot), Constantia (serif; John Hudson), and Corbel (sans; Jeremy Tankard) — so they will clump together in font menus (so long as you don’t have other fonts whose names get in the way — Caslon, for example).

I am having a strongly negative response to these fonts. Unfortunately, I have only seen fairly large specimens of what are intended for use in text sizes, so cannot really evaluate them.

Anyway, something new to think about.

   
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Old 03-21-2005, 02:18 PM   #2
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>>kt: They are designed for Microsoft’s ClearType technology, so it appears that Mac, Linux, and other non-users of Windows will not be able to use these fonts.

Will that's kind of silly-assed isn't it???

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Old 03-21-2005, 04:00 PM   #3
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From the same site:

"CORRECTION: An earlier version of this article reported incorrectly that these new fonts could not be displayed on Macs. In fact, they can be -- but only if the operator of a website has licensed them for embedding or if an individual user has licensed them for personal use."

Which suggests that they can be viewed on Macs. Besides, ClearType is a technology for making text look better on screen, not a font format.

   
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Old 03-21-2005, 04:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg
"CORRECTION: An earlier version of this article reported incorrectly that these new fonts could not be displayed on Macs. In fact, they can be -- but only if the operator of a website has licensed them for embedding or if an individual user has licensed them for personal use."

Which suggests that they can be viewed on Macs. Besides, ClearType is a technology for making text look better on screen, not a font format.
Mac users can view the fonts — I have, myself — but I don’t think they can have them or set them.

And I am not sure what Mac users will see — probably a TT or OT version of the font?

   
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Old 03-21-2005, 05:44 PM   #5
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" ... if an individual user has licensed them for personal use" would be a meaningless distinction if the user *can't* license them for personal use.

Besides, ClearType being a display technology - a way of enhancing the way text is displayed (primarily on LCD screens) and not a font format, we'll ALL be seeing TT or OT versions of the font.

   
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Old 03-21-2005, 06:10 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg
" ... if an individual user has licensed them for personal use" would be a meaningless distinction if the user *can't* license them for personal use.

Besides, ClearType being a display technology - a way of enhancing the way text is displayed (primarily on LCD screens) and not a font format, we'll ALL be seeing TT or OT versions of the font.
Good point.

But it does divide people somewhat — if Windows web site developers specify the fonts in CSS and the rest of us don’t have them, we will not see them. So long as the text is straightforward, no big deal. But if it gets tricky, could be messy.

Will take a while to get to that point anyway — Longhorn isn’t expected for another year or so.

   
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Old 03-21-2005, 08:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel
Good point.

But it does divide people somewhat — if Windows web site developers specify the fonts in CSS and the rest of us don’t have them, we will not see them. So long as the text is straightforward, no big deal. But if it gets tricky, could be messy.

Will take a while to get to that point anyway — Longhorn isn’t expected for another year or so.
I'm confident that the only problem for Mac users is that the fonts won't be offered (legally) to Mac users. They will certainly be OpenType fonts, and should work fine on a Mac. Unless Microsoft offers them in a retail package, or supplies them in a bundle with Mac Office, there may not be a legitimate way for Mac users to get them, though. Whatever optimization is included to make best use of ClearType shouldn't affect how the fonts display on Macs (or how they print from a PC, which doesn't involve ClearType).

I expect that you will be able to copy the OpenType fonts from a Longhorn PC to your Mac, if you're willing to ignore the strict legalities and want to see these actual fonts specified on web sites.
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Old 03-22-2005, 05:14 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen Owades
I'm confident that the only problem for Mac users is that the fonts won't be offered (legally) to Mac users. They will certainly be OpenType fonts, and should work fine on a Mac. Unless Microsoft offers them in a retail package, or supplies them in a bundle with Mac Office, there may not be a legitimate way for Mac users to get them, though. Whatever optimization is included to make best use of ClearType shouldn't affect how the fonts display on Macs (or how they print from a PC, which doesn't involve ClearType).
I eventually figured out that the format would be OT — ClearType being the icing on the cake (so to speak). After all, even Windows users are not universally going to be using ClearType (for one reason or another; some seem not to like it).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen Owades
I expect that you will be able to copy the OpenType fonts from a Longhorn PC to your Mac, if you're willing to ignore the strict legalities and want to see these actual fonts specified on web sites.
I guess I could review the fonts but without a license, I cannot really use them. I still know some of the people in the MS type group — perhaps they will provide a set.

   
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Old 03-22-2005, 11:05 AM   #9
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>>But it does divide people somewhat — if Windows web site developers specify the fonts in CSS and the rest of us don’t have them, we will not see them. So long as the text is straightforward, no big deal. But if it gets tricky, could be messy.

And this is different from specifying any font that isn't universal ... how? ;-)

   
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Old 03-22-2005, 11:08 AM   #10
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And who's willing to bet that MS won't sooner or later include the fonts in Office (and thence MacOffice)?

   
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