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Old 01-06-2008, 11:02 PM   #11
Richard Waller
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Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
we had a man-eating (or at least man-puncturing) hedge out front.
Known here as a cat-stopper.

   
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Old 01-07-2008, 07:05 AM   #12
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Known here as a cat-stopper.
<g>

I don't remember what this stuff was, but it'd have fit that description nicely.

   
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Old 01-07-2008, 07:38 AM   #13
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Steve:

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I'd have appreciated a good pair of thornproof gloves at one point ... we had a man-eating (or at least man-puncturing) hedge out front
I understand that you have plenty of species that produce thorns much fiercer than quickthorn, so I can well believe it. Is quickthorn even native in North America?

   
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Old 01-07-2008, 03:27 PM   #14
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You wouldn't want to trust my knowledge of plantlife past "Has thorns" or "Is green". I'm allowed to turn over earth but after that, Herself shoos me out of the way so she can get on with making it fruitful.

   
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Old 01-07-2008, 05:23 PM   #15
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Steve:



I understand that you have plenty of species that produce thorns much fiercer than quickthorn, so I can well believe it. Is quickthorn even native in North America?
I'd never heard the name "quickthorn" so I looked it up and quickthorn = hawthorn (Crataegus sp.). Yes, there are several species in North America (apparently more than 300 species across the northern hemisphere).

In my experience, the nastiest thorns are on blackberry bushes--at least, the variety that grows on the west coast of Canada--nature's own razor wire.

   
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Old 01-07-2008, 07:35 PM   #16
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I think perhaps what we had was pyracantha. It grew like a weed, needed trimming every couple of weeks or the hedge started to look badly in need of a haircut.

The spines were small, thin and needle-like, with tips that broke off easily once they'd penetrated the glove and a layer or two of skin. Nasty things.

   
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:27 PM   #17
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Hmm. I don't think I've ever seen anything of leather made from horse hide. Much thinner, perhaps?
Yeah, I think that's the case. OTOH, a horsey friend who bought a dairy farm commented a few years later that 'cows die, but horses kill themselves'.

   
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:37 PM   #18
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Probably something to do with the fact that vets' fees for cows are relatively low whereas those for horse are astronomical.
I think one reason they charge more for horses is that they're more likely to get hurt by a horse, so have to carry more insurance and are more often put out of action by horses. My regular vet stopped treating horses several years ago, so I now have one vet for the dog and another vet for the horses. And my horse vet refused to train for the current equine influenza vaccination campaign. Those vets who are doing the buffer zone (compulsory vaccination) report horrific experiences going into small acreage blocks where the horses are pets and have never been trained to respect people or behave themselves, and of course those properties don't have proper yards for handling the horses anyway.

Having said that, one of my horses misbehaved a little yesterday morning while the (EI accredited) vet doing the vaccination was trying to insert the RFID microchip (very large needle and associated pain). She was very badly treated before I got her. The other horse, the one I bred and trained, behaved impeccably, thank goodness!

   
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:45 PM   #19
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Some horses are trained to jump fences. I am no expert, but I see rather high fences around fields with horses.
Most horses will stay happily in a paddock with a 1.5 metre fence. If a horse consistently jumps out of its paddock, it could be a sign that it has a talent for showjumping. In which case, if it's young enough when this is discovered and it's sent to a talented jumping rider, it could be worth a lot of money. I remember one eventing rider who had a horse like that. It was so talented that it used to jump out of the yards at horse events, where the fences tend to be over 2 metres high with very little run up.

   
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Old 01-08-2008, 02:51 AM   #20
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My regular vet stopped treating horses several years ago, so I now have one vet for the dog and another vet for the horses.
We're very fortunate, we have a specialist equine vet practice nearby - three very attractive young women who just do horses and donkeys.

Of course, the fact that they are attractive young women has nothing to do with them being good vets but it does mean I rush out to the stable to lend a hand whenever they visit.

   
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