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Old 10-22-2007, 02:31 PM   #1
ktinkel
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Default Gocco anyone?

I had heard about this compact, un-messy sort of silk-screen printing dingus years ago, but never found one. I used to do a bit of screen printing, and the tedious aspects — sensitizing or otherwise preparing the screen (lightboxes, film positives, resists, etc.) and printing (making or setting up the screen, hinging it to a work bench, setting up registration stops, etc.) — kind of got me to drift away from it. But I have always loved the medium.

This Sunday the New York Times Magazine had an article in the “Consumed” column: The Cult of Gocco. The article said the device was originally designed for home-made greeting cards, business cards, letterhead, etc., in Japan and that the manufacturer has decided to discontinue it because of competition with computers and their printers.

It does demand some craft (its virtue is that it combines the screen-making and printing to some extent). But it is also very clever. (Electric iron required for preparing the art for the screen.)

I first heard of it from print-making friends, who were charmed by its simplicity and the fact that the prints were indistinguishable from those made from conventional screens. With the computer, today we can make artwork on the computer (or in other ways), so the tool is even more versatile than it seemed in the 1980s.

Anyway, I found one, ordered it, and hope to receive it by Friday. Very exciting.

   
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Old 10-22-2007, 03:19 PM   #2
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Sounds interesting...wish the the NYC Times article had a pic of the device...do let me know what you think when you get it...

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Old 10-22-2007, 05:37 PM   #3
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Sounds interesting...wish the the NYC Times article had a pic of the device...do let me know what you think when you get it...
Sure. In the meantime, the place I found mine (Northwood Studios) has some photos of the Gocco.

And an Australian company (NEHOC) has videos, tutorials, and lots of tips on how to use the thing.

   
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Old 10-22-2007, 07:16 PM   #4
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Ah, I've seen these in Japan. New Year's cards, almost always handmade, are very popular in Japan. These little gadgets make the "handmade" part a whole lot less painful.

ISTR seeing them at Tokyu Hands:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tokyu_Hands

Wonderful place to spend half an hour or half a day if you happen to be nearby.

   
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Old 10-23-2007, 01:35 PM   #5
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kt: In the meantime, the place I found mine (Northwood Studios) has some photos of the Gocco.
Thanks!

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Old 10-23-2007, 02:36 PM   #6
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I think this is the grandfather of serigraphy. You can do this easy if you have a dense net some like the ones that we put at our house windows to keep the bugs outside, some glue that hardens a little bit slow, a crayon, and a brush that is used for paints.
Make a frame (wood is the fast way) pin down the net, draw the graphic that you want to imprint then with the brush with glue fill the outside part of the graphic. Let it dry well. Then put the "device" on the surface that you need to be imprinted put some paint (not much) and squeeze it. That should do it. I think that is a "tutorial" on youtube about it.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=6DkJyzEONUk

Something like that instead of T shirt you can use any kind of material as for the making of the screen you can choose for an computer based one or an hand made one. Go creative and good luck.

   
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Old 10-23-2007, 03:16 PM   #7
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I think this is the grandfather of serigraphy.
I would say that Gocco is the grandchild.

I always used to buy special fabrics for use in “silk” screens (they haven’t actually been silk for decades).

The tusche/resist method you describe is still in use for non-photographic screen-printing. I used to play with sponges laden with resist or glue to create background tones, for example. (Some sort of photo-resist and sensitizing lights are needed for halftone screens.)

Whether it is easy or not kind of depends on how many colors you want to lay down, what sort of registration system you have, and other details. And it does tend to be messy.

The beauty of this little toy is the lack of mess. IMHO, anyway.

   
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Old 10-23-2007, 04:36 PM   #8
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There also used to be a photo-sensitive emulsion that you could apply to the screen then (as I recall) contact print a large film negative or positive using flood lights and finally wash out. Exposure to light made the emulsion insoluble.

Kind of a messy business, and you had to keep the whole works in the dark until it was exposed and washed out.

And wasn't there some kind of gel- or rubylith-like substance that worked the same way?

We used to use this stuff to reproduce horses on the walls of the cave and stuff. <g>

   
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Old 10-24-2007, 01:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel View Post
I would say that Gocco is the grandchild.

I always used to buy special fabrics for use in “silk” screens (they haven’t actually been silk for decades).

The tusche/resist method you describe is still in use for non-photographic screen-printing. I used to play with sponges laden with resist or glue to create background tones, for example. (Some sort of photo-resist and sensitizing lights are needed for halftone screens.)
Funny how this whole discussion brings back memories of my days in the Academy of Arts - and a color (really bright pink) and (a bit vaguer) the smell of it. I never did much with screen-printing (no more than get a basic concept of the technique) but found it was rather fun anyway.

   
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Old 10-24-2007, 02:19 PM   #10
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Funny how this whole discussion brings back memories of my days in the Academy of Arts - and a color (really bright pink) and (a bit vaguer) the smell of it. I never did much with screen-printing (no more than get a basic concept of the technique) but found it was rather fun anyway.
It is fun. I too remember inks and their smells — not just from print-making, but from my years in NYC as a graphic designer/production cheapskate. That took me into buildings that had only been used for printing for a century or more, and the building itself reeked of ink!

I have also made prints with many media — wood or linoleum blocks, etching, as well as screen-printing — but screen-printing is the most flexible. Just makes a big mess and requires a large-ish messy space.

So I will see how this toy works. It might amuse me for a while. The inks and other materials arrived today; the unit itself should come in a day or two.

Should certainly be more fun than the tortuous process of setting up this iMac and fiddling with the network, that is for sure!

   
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