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Old 03-14-2005, 07:15 AM   #1
dehavenphoto
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Default photo resolution plus CYMK or RGB

So far, I am printing all of my small quantity materials on the Xerox Phaser 8400 DP. My photos are srgb and I send the InDesign files to the Phaser as RGB instead of CYMK. CYMK prints SRGB photos really crappy.

Am I doing this right or should I change my photos to CYMK and print evrything CYMK? Or does it really matter? I just want to get the best quality.

Also, how do I judge what size to make my photos as far as size and resolution? For example, if I want my photo to print out in InDesign as 2"x2", should I make it 2"x2" in Photoshop? And at what resolution? I am trying to print the highest quality I can. Xerox states the 8400 prints at 2400 Finepoint (TM), 600 dpi. Finepoint is apparently some Xerox thing that makes it print at 2400 dpi????? So then, do I make my photos 2x2 @ 2400 dpi?

Any help appreciated. Thanks,
Jack DeHaven
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Old 03-14-2005, 10:26 AM   #2
JohnC
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Jack, I'm not familiar with the Phaser in particular. But most desktop printers expect to get RGB data. Although many of them use CMYK inks/toners, the printer driver does the conversion to CMYK. If you conver to CMYK yourself than it gets converted back to RGB to go to the printer, where it is converted back to CMYK. Results are usually bad.

Full color, continuous tone images (photographs) need to be between 180 and 300 dpi. Anything more than that is usually thrown away by the printer. Text and b/w bitmap images might be printing at the higher DPI, but photos don't need that. Try a couple of samples of the same image at 2"x2" at 180dpi, 240dpi, and 300dpi. Put them next to each other in a document and send it to your printer. Then you can see if one of those looks better than the others.

John
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Old 03-14-2005, 01:34 PM   #3
terrie
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>>jack: CYMK prints SRGB photos really crappy.

On one leve I'm not surprised...

I've never worked with the Phaser so I can't advise you specifically but I have a couple of questions:

1. Is your monitor calibrated--either hardware using something like the ColorVision Spyder ( http://www.colorvision.com/ ) or characterized by using Adobe Gamma?

2. Does the Phaser allow you to use paper profiles and if so, are you using the profile for the paper you're printing on?

3. Why are you using sRGB? What happens if you use AdobeRGB1998?


>>Am I doing this right or should I change my photos to CYMK and print evrything CYMK? Or does it really matter? I just want to get the best quality.

More than likely, you don't want to convert to CMYK...as JohnC has mentioned, a double conversion would take place with very ugly results...'-}}


>>Also, how do I judge what size to make my photos as far as size and resolution?

Again, as JohnC has mentioned, for color stuff, 180ppi/dpi to 300ppi/dpi will probably do you better in the long run--it's my understanding that line art should be res'd to the max of your printer...I use 300ppi/dpi when printing to my Epson 4000.

Experiment a bit in Photoshop...change the res to 300ppi/dpi and see where your sizing falls...you may need to crop/select a portion of your image to get your 2x2/300ppi...let me know if you have questions on that and I can give you some ideas on how to approach that...

Finally...do the Phaser drivers allow you a setting like "no color adjustment"--this is on the Phaser driver side, not on the Photoshop print window side!

I ask, because with my Epson printers, I get better screen to print match when I specify the paper profile in the Photoshop print window and in the Epson driver side print window (under custom/advanced settings), I choose "no color adjustment"...

Hope this helps...

Terrie

PS: What OS are you using?
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Old 03-14-2005, 04:48 PM   #4
dehavenphoto
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I am using windows 2000. My monitor is calibrated. I'm using a Monaco puck and a LaCie monitor. Color is great. I am using srgb because the labs I use for printing my photos ALL recommend SRGB. Only the book writers recommend Adobe RGB. Labs don't!

All of my files have the srgb profile since that is what we send to the lab.

I'm using the Phaser and InDesign CS to print my flyers, price lists, etc. I'm getting good color straight from the Phaser. It will allow you to add printer profiles but I don't need one as I am happy with the printer out of the box.

I do get good color on my flyers when I print them in rgb. I tried cymk because Adobe seems to default to it. I tried setting up my preferences with no document open so they would be the default but I must have missed something.

I'll do the 2x2 at various resolutions and see what is best. Don't want bigger files than I need but want the best output.

Thanks,

Jack
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Old 03-16-2005, 02:15 PM   #5
terrie
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>>jack: I am using windows 2000.

Ah-ha! That answers the question I had to you in your other post about setting prefs in IDCS...'-}}


>>I tried setting up my preferences with no document open so they would be the default but I must have missed something.

In the Color palette, you can set the pref to RGB (click on the options arrow for the tab) and as I mentioned in my post in the other thread, it appears to be sticking after I close and then open but I won't know if it's permanently set until I reboot. I don't know how setting this in the Color palette impacts the other color aspects of IDCS...

Terrie
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Old 03-24-2005, 06:27 AM   #6
Clayton
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My experience has been with the HP8500 color laser at work and the Epson 850 inkjet at home. Both use cmyk inks, but both require rgb inputs because they do the conversion according to their own tables. Anyways, ....

I've run tests in the past to see how small a file I can send to each printer before noticing any difference in print quality. In each case I used the printer's "best" settings, and the "best" paper recommended by each manufacturer.

I prepared my photo files to print at 5 x 7 inches, with resolutions of 300, 200, 150, and 120. I printed the samples, coded them, and passed them around to various folks at work, and asked them to point out the "best" and the "worst".

At home, I did the same, passing them around to my wife and my cat (sorry, that's all I got at home).

Results: Most of the people picked the 120 dpi prints as "not as good as the others", and nobody could really see any difference in the 300, 200, and 150 dpi versions. The cat just gave me his usual indignant look and walked away.

My suggestion: Work and save your files at the largest pixel count you think you might ever need. Don't target or sharpen your images until you resize them to final print size and resolution. For office and home printing, this would be 150 dpi. Then sharpen, target, and print away!
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