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Old 06-17-2007, 04:10 AM   #11
PeterArnel
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Originally Posted by curveto View Post
I knew that if you built it they would come! Looks like a good place where I can lurk and learn.

I've got the whole image to ink on paper thing down but recently (due to my work with tictacphoto.com) re-acquired a serious interest in the image acquisition side of the fence. In that realm, the gear I now have is much more capable than the loose nut behind the wheel, err... shutter.

Anyone that has any camera work tips do please share.

Thanks!
JR

PS - Dropped off the radar consumed with PrintSmith 8 dev, btw.
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Old 09-13-2007, 06:42 PM   #12
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I don't know Rebel -- but the most fruitful thing I've done lately with my newish 30D is take the same picture (tripod is useful here!) using all the different metering modes. Pro tem conclusion: spot metering often gives best results with spot subject (flower); more distributed modes often -- not always-- best for landscapes and more distributed subjects.

I did the same thing with shutter speed (I'm shooting in Tv -- speed-set-- mode currently) when I started getting serious with the 10D. It turns out that for most of what I want, 100 is about right -- if I negate camera shake with a tripod, the wind takes up the job. It's then easy to change a bit up or down -- down for a flower on a very still day, up for gusty or the cat chasing the dog.

I assume the Rebel gives you the option of shooting in RAW mode? (I should look it up, I know -- well, look it up AND remember or write it down...) It's the only way! ThumbsPlus can handle it and Photoshop from CS2 comes with a marvelous "Bridge" module with which you can make adjustments and see them, supposedly without degrading the pixels as happens when the image is loaded into PS and manipulated (probably the bundled software has an equivalent -- I didn't see any reason to load it).

Also. Keep the apparent not totally impossible (unrecognisably blurred, forgot the lens cap) duds for a while -- bad exposure, a little fuzzy, unsatisfactory framing, etc. --they are good to refer to for quite some time. Thumbs Plus and I don't know what other programs let you see the EXIF data (everything the camera tells about itself for the shot), and you can learn a lot with an archive on file. I organise my RAW files by month.

One thing that I'm still getting used to, coming from film and a P&S digital: you can increase the ISO speed (as I suspect you've found already) with an astonishing lack of noise. 400 was newspaper-grainy on film -- hard to tell the difference with the D's.
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Old 09-14-2007, 01:12 PM   #13
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Spot metering is great under certain conditions... The spot you select to meter is indeed translates into a medium gray tone or you really know what you are doing.

If the spot you meter is brighter than medium gray you have to know to open up the lens (or use a slower shutter speed) from that the meter says. Conversely, if the spot you meter is darker, you have to close down/higher shutter speed.

For me, I prefer AV (aperture) mode. I want to control my depth of field. Let the shutter speed fall where it may unless it is way too slow and will lead to subject movement blur. Then start considering upping the ISO (at the expense of grain/noise). If subject is static and the speed is slow I can go to a tripod.

I might switch to TV (shutter speed priority) if photographing sports or some fast moving objects. The rest of the time it is manual or aperture priority for me.
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Old 09-15-2007, 04:30 PM   #14
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I might switch to TV (shutter speed priority) if photographing sports or some fast moving objects. The rest of the time it is manual or aperture priority for me.
That's exactly how I approach it.

   
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Old 09-16-2007, 08:19 AM   #15
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That's exactly how I approach it.
Me too.

   
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Old 09-18-2007, 01:03 PM   #16
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I use TV mode set to 100 most of the time. The light on the plants changes too fast to mess with anything -- I might, after the first shot. Even with a tripod and remote shutter trip, 100 is likely to be the slowest speed that will stop fluttering plant parts, given that the air here is usually moving. The difference in DOF is negligible so far as I can see and is more than made up for by the sharper picture. I'm more likely to have a problem with not blurring out the background than with DOF in the flower itself, unless I get greedy and try to get a quarter-inch flower filling the frame. (The Botany Photo of the Day for Sep 17 was taken wide open at 800! And it's as good a picture as I've ever seen, of that sort.) BPOD
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