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Old 05-20-2007, 10:01 AM   #1
don Arnoldy
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Default Prepress tips

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Originally Posted by P-Rex View Post
I just purchased a good book on prepress. It covers all the basics and has some great tips in it.
Looks interesting. So, what was your favorite tip?

   
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Old 05-22-2007, 08:03 AM   #2
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Looks interesting. So, what was your favorite tip?
I have two favourite tips: the first is the one where the author shows how to preview color plates in InDesign. This is a handy feature that lets you check your separations before printing. The second is applying different styles to Open type fonts in InDesign. Lots of other tips and short cuts.
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Old 06-14-2007, 02:38 PM   #3
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he also provides key commands in the instructions that are cross platform so PC users can use them too
Yes, he does; but the amount of misinformation (about fonts in the Macintosh) doesn't engender confidence about his main theme, which is how to deal with illustrations.

   
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Old 06-15-2007, 12:49 AM   #4
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Ok, I'll bite.

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but the amount of misinformation (about fonts in the Macintosh) doesn't engender confidence about his main theme, which is how to deal with illustrations.
I'd be surprised if the book contained facts that were severely untrue.
Can you give us an example of the misinformation?
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Old 06-15-2007, 07:33 AM   #5
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Ben:

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I'd be surprised if the book contained facts that were severely untrue
So would I: I just said that some of the few 'facts' I had any knowledge about were mistaken. For instance, there is no need to deliberately choose, say, Adobe Garamond Pro Italic when you need it, because that style is linked to Adobe Garamond Pro Regular: it's automatically chosen when you press the 'Italic' button. Another example is the author's view that Type 1 fonts are better suited to Mac OSs than TrueType fonts: it is perhaps true that designers prefer Type 1 fonts still, that's the result of their natural conservatism (and a large library of Type 1 fonts!).

These things are not serious, and certainly don't affect the author's advice on pre-press work.

   
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Old 06-15-2007, 10:43 AM   #6
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Ben:



So would I: I just said that some of the few 'facts' I had any knowledge about were mistaken. For instance, there is no need to deliberately choose, say, Adobe Garamond Pro Italic when you need it, because that style is linked to Adobe Garamond Pro Regular: it's automatically chosen when you press the 'Italic' button. Another example is the author's view that Type 1 fonts are better suited to Mac OSs than TrueType fonts: it is perhaps true that designers prefer Type 1 fonts still, that's the result of their natural conservatism (and a large library of Type 1 fonts!).

These things are not serious, and certainly don't affect the author's advice on pre-press work.
Hi Michael,

The author might have been using Adobe Garamond Pro as an example in this case. It isn't a good idea to apply style buttons if you're not sure they are linked to the actual font. I've seen cases where the style didn't show up on the plates after they were imaged. He does recommend using Type 1 fonts as they are more reliable with older RIPs using postscript level 1 or 2, but TrueType fonts are not a concern with postscript level 3.

Some his facts seem to be from a Mac/designer point of view.
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Old 06-15-2007, 03:10 PM   #7
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The author might have been using Adobe Garamond Pro as an example in this case. It isn't a good idea to apply style buttons if you're not sure they are linked to the actual font.
I chose Adobe Garamond Pro (more precisely, Acrobat Premier Pro) because I've got it and could see what fonts the family contained; they're all linked, and in Windows applications only the name of the Regular will appear in menus (I'm not sure about Mac OS 10 applications). In any case, no one with any sense uses a font family blind.

In a paper on fonts written originally in 1995,* but since updated several times, Phinney remarks that the old story about image processors not being able to cope with TrueType fonts is just that: a story. (I've seen that in the 2001 edition.) And of course, The Mac OS has had a TrueType rasterizer since 1991, and Windows since 1992.

Anderson, who's a Professor of Graphic Design at Durham College, Otttawa, might have been expected to have read the more general literature on fonts before writing about them in his book.

*'TrueType, PostScript Type 1, & OpenType: 'What’s the Difference?', Thomas W. Phinney, Version 2.36, December 26, 2004.

   
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Old 06-15-2007, 04:58 PM   #8
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I chose Adobe Garamond Pro (more precisely, Acrobat Premier Pro) because I've got it and could see what fonts the family contained; they're all linked, and in Windows applications only the name of the Regular will appear in menus (I'm not sure about Mac OS 10 applications). In any case, no one with any sense uses a font family blind.

In a paper on fonts written originally in 1995,* but since updated several times, Phinney remarks that the old story about image processors not being able to cope with TrueType fonts is just that: a story. (I've seen that in the 2001 edition.) And of course, The Mac OS has had a TrueType rasterizer since 1991, and Windows since 1992.

Anderson, who's a Professor of Graphic Design at Durham College, Otttawa, might have been expected to have read the more general literature on fonts before writing about them in his book.

*'TrueType, PostScript Type 1, & OpenType: 'What’s the Difference?', Thomas W. Phinney, Version 2.36, December 26, 2004.
He certainly isn't the only one to have said that there are potential problems with TrueType fonts. Robin Williams said in Chapter 9 of her book How to Boss Your Fonts Around, "Service bureaus use high-end PostScript imagesetters to 'image' print, output the pages. The TrueType technology disagrees with these imagesetters, and service bureaus generally prefer (many adamantly insist) that you not bring TrueType into their shops in your documents."

Here are a few other sources which say the same thing:

http://www.bookmasters.com/print/epfonts.htm

http://www.bookprinters.com/prepress/fonts.html

http://www.graphic-design.com/DTG/Design/Output.html

The author never says not to use TrueType fonts, but reommends asking your service provider if the RIP on their imagesetter can handle TrueType fonts before outputting them. After reading the book I switched to buying only OpenType fonts which the author recommends.
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Old 06-16-2007, 01:50 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Michael Rowley View Post
For instance, there is no need to deliberately choose, say, Adobe Garamond Pro Italic when you need it, because that style is linked to Adobe Garamond Pro Regular: it's automatically chosen when you press the 'Italic' button. Another example is the author's view that Type 1 fonts are better suited to Mac OSs than TrueType fonts: it is perhaps true that designers prefer Type 1 fonts still, that's the result of their natural conservatism (and a large library of Type 1 fonts!).
I concurr with P-Rex.
The danger in using the style button is that clicking a style button gives no guarantee that the correct weight of font is selected. You can, for instance, select italic in the style menu even if you don't own the italic weight.
Also, in some fonts, the Bold style is linked to semibold, rather than Bold.
In the industry, it has been consider 'bad style' to use the Quark style buttons, but rather to select the actual font, as he suggests.

As for TrueType, there were lots of problems with TT fonts on PS level 2 RIPs. I have seen this happen, and had to re-set a book in a replacement PS font, as the filmsetter produced jibberish in the place of a TT font.
As hardware with level 3 RIPs have been introduced, the problem is less acute.
You certainly get cleaner PostScript from a PS T1 font than from a TrueType font. As Macs have built-in PostScript support, it is not contentious advice to favour T1 fonts.
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Old 06-16-2007, 06:36 AM   #10
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He certainly isn't the only one to have said that there are potential problems with TrueType fonts.
Of course: at one time, I believe, image-setters did have problems with TrueType fonts.

   
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