DTP


 
Lively discussions on the graphic arts and publishing — in print or on the web


Go Back   Desktop Publishing Forum > General Discussions > The Corner Pub

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-29-2007, 12:53 PM   #1
Hugh Wyn Griffith
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,428
Default Illuminating the Word

On Tuesday, in the Floridean section, our local St Petersburg Times had an unusual article on the exhibition at the Naples FL Art Museum of pages from the new St John's Bible being produced by the Benedictine Monks at St John's Abbey in Minnesota.



Here's the link to the article:
http://www.sptimes.com/2007/03/27/Fl..._designs.shtml
and to a fascinating video of Donald Jackson talking about the illumination and calligraphy.

<< [Jackson was] appointed a scribe to the Crown Office at the House of Lords. In other words, he became "The Queen's Scribe."

Since then, in conjunction with a wide range of other calligraphic projects, he has continued to execute Historic Royal documents including Letters Patent under The Great Seal and Royal Charters. He was decorated by the Queen with the Medal of The Royal Victorian Order (MVO) which is awarded for personal services to the Sovereign in 1985. >>


Illuminating the Word -- Video of Donald Jackson working on the Saint John’s Bible.
http://www.sptimes.com/2007/webspeci...on/index.shtml
Here's a link to the Benedictine's own website:
http://www.saintjohnsbible.org/index.html
The page there on the "Welsh Team" is fascinating -- they are all so young!
http://www.saintjohnsbible.org/people/wales_team.htm
Enjoy!

   
__________________


Hugh
Hugh Wyn Griffith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 01:24 PM   #2
Michael Rowley
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ipswich (the one in England)
Posts: 5,105
Default

Hugh:

"In the 8th Century, near what are now Scotland and England, Benedictine monastic scribes created a Bible . . ."

I didn't know that Scotland and England had expanded their territories since the 8th century A.D., and the only place that's at all near to both countries is Ireland—so why don't the Benedictines of modern St John's say so?

   
__________________
Michael
Michael Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 05:49 PM   #3
Hugh Wyn Griffith
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,428
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley View Post
Hugh:

"In the 8th Century, near what are now Scotland and England, Benedictine monastic scribes created a Bible . . ."

I didn't know that Scotland and England had expanded their territories since the 8th century A.D., and the only place that's at all near to both countries is Ireland—so why don't the Benedictines of modern St John's say so?
I have no idea -- ideas of Geography are just as vague from East to West as from West to East.

But was Northumberland for example, the Border Country, not considered its own self?

   
__________________


Hugh
Hugh Wyn Griffith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2007, 12:08 AM   #4
LoisWakeman
Staff
 
LoisWakeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Uplyme, Devon, England
Posts: 1,402
Default

Yes: Northumberland was a kingdom in its own right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:B..._isles_802.jpg

shows an 802 map;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:England-878ad.jpg

is a bit later, but shows England stretching to the Firth of Forth in the East (but Scotland having more territory in the West: Kelvyn would have been close to the border I think?)

More at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History...-Saxon_England
LoisWakeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2007, 07:09 AM   #5
Michael Rowley
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ipswich (the one in England)
Posts: 5,105
Default

Hugh:

Quote:
But was Northumberland for example, the Border Country, not considered its own self?
Northumbria, Mercia, East Anglia, Wessex, etc. were under separate rulers in the 8th century, but Bede (d. 735) wrote the history of the 'English' church. 'Germany' wasn't a separate state until the late 19th century, but no one writes about a place 'near what later became France and Germany'. ('France' didn't exist in the 8th century either.)

   
__________________
Michael
Michael Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2007, 08:10 AM   #6
LoisWakeman
Staff
 
LoisWakeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Uplyme, Devon, England
Posts: 1,402
Default

Well, Wikipedia is written by committee, so occasionally you get some camel turds (as well as bulls**t)!
LoisWakeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2007, 11:07 AM   #7
Michael Rowley
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ipswich (the one in England)
Posts: 5,105
Default

Lois:

Quote:
Wikipedia is written by committee
The Wikipedia entry for that period (600–800 A.D.) actually seems pretty good, though I hadn't read it when I replied to Hugh. The information I had was from a BBC history of the period, which has the advantage of being written by a named historian. (He actually mentioned Devon and Cornwell as independent political units at the time.) Kelvyn lives in the area that was Strathclyde once.

The Normans sorted everyone out!

   
__________________
Michael
Michael Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Microsoft Word URL dthomsen8 General Publishing Topics 11 12-14-2007 08:45 AM
Word Images to PS BobRoosth Print Design 5 11-05-2006 02:29 PM
MS Word Pictures to the Web dthomsen8 General Publishing Topics 13 07-02-2006 11:08 PM
word for indesign Norman Hathaway Print Design 25 05-23-2006 09:20 PM
pdf in word PeterArnel Print Production & Automation 31 05-30-2005 07:48 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Contents copyright 2004–2014 Desktop Publishing Forum and its members.