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Old 01-23-2007, 02:47 AM   #1
dthomsen8
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Default Bound Material / Google Project

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Originally Posted by Howard White View Post
... "Bound material" makes life even tougher, because it's often hard to get pages to lay flat enough for a good scan.
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It's a bit off the topic, but I wonder how Google is scanning all those books from libraries. Surely they aren't cutting them up, but the scanning and OCR must be proceeding somehow.
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Old 01-23-2007, 04:57 AM   #2
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Default Archival Scanning by Google and Others

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It's a bit off the topic, but I wonder how Google is scanning all those books from libraries. Surely they aren't cutting them up, but the scanning and OCR must be proceeding somehow.
Off topic it may be, but it is a subject of interest to me as well.

I have been trying to "re-publish" as PDFs certain out-of-print books and historical maps in my collection for personal use. I find that my existing setup is not up to the job, not that it was ever intended to do what I now wish to do. I am using a Brother MFC-8840D multifunction printer/scanner/fax machine with the PaperPort SE 9.0 (9.2.0.814) software that come bundled with it.

I could never afford the hardware and software that Google or the archivists at the Library of Congress are using, but it would be useful to know if only to borrow what ideas I can.

To do a better job, I clearly need a larger format flatbed scanner along with Adobe Acrobat. That's a given.

If additional software is needed or recommended for OCR or to obtain better scans or work with those scans (eliminate edges and shadows, remove moiré patterns from pics, center text and photos, align pages, etc.) then I would like to know what all I should acquire. Not having done this type of work before, I do not know what to expect or what questions to ask. I solicit advice. Thanks.

   
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Old 01-23-2007, 05:03 AM   #3
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Default New Thread!

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Off topic it may be, but it is a subject of interest to me as well.
Let's start a new thread, posting your last message recast a bit.

In addition to the technical questions, Google is encountering a lot of questions about copyrights and other legal and moral issues. Virgil and Shakespeare aren't around to complain, but a lot of living authors are asking questions, too. That discussion should be in a different section of this forum.

KT, can you help us?
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Old 01-23-2007, 05:41 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by dthomsen8 View Post
Let's start a new thread, posting your last message recast a bit.

In addition to the technical questions, Google is encountering a lot of questions about copyrights and other legal and moral issues. Virgil and Shakespeare aren't around to complain, but a lot of living authors are asking questions, too.
IMO, copyrights should be like patents. After a certain number of years, the published work becomes public domain. Copyrights should never, ever be renewable.

That does not necessarily mean some other publisher can come along later and republish an expired work for profit, but it should certainly allow a university professor to share whole or partial works with classes and colleagues or individuals to do the same. So long as there is no exchange of money -- including fees for distribution, processing, scanning, handling, packaging, shipping, etc. -- it should be allowed and legal. That is not the case presently.

I applaud Google for spearheading the effort to make published works available for all. If everything in the Library of Congress were readable and downloadable, what a different and better world this would be.

   
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Old 01-23-2007, 11:42 AM   #5
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IMO, copyrights should be like patents. After a certain number of years, the published work becomes public domain. Copyrights should never, ever be renewable.
And that's exactly how copyrights work.

The only thing is that different countries tend to have (somewhat) different periods after which copyrights "expire" and the works become public domain.

   
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Old 01-23-2007, 12:07 PM   #6
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Marjolein:

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The only thing is that different countries tend to have (somewhat) different periods after which copyrights "expire" and the works become public domain.
I believe the copyright in 'Peter Pan' does not expire, because Barrie bequeathed it to the Children's Hospital in Great Ormond Street in London; Parliament made a special exception. Possibly exceptions have been made in other jurisdictions.

   
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Old 01-25-2007, 11:45 PM   #7
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And that's exactly how copyrights work.
No, copyrights are renewable, at least in the US, such that rights to a work never expire. Moreover, personal use exemptions do not apply to distributing material to others, even in an educational situation.

One professor, X, packaged course material which he made available to colleagues at other universities, who in turn made it available to their students. X did not charge for the material, but he did charge for reproduction, shipping and handling, a key point. In a legal battle brought by a copyright holder, X lost because of that key point. The case may have gone to appeal, but I do not know the ultimate outcome.

   
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Old 01-26-2007, 05:57 AM   #8
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No, copyrights are renewable, at least in the US
I don't think so: as far as I know, US copyright law limits copyright to so many years after the death of the author; the period of years may vary from country to country, though even in that case countries generally try to keep in step. You may be thinking about copyrights that had expired under old legislation and were renewed when the period was extended.

   
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Old 01-26-2007, 06:05 AM   #9
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U.S. Copyrights have not been renewable since 1967 when we adopted the “life plus n years” model for copyright terms. That n has changed, from 50 to 70 years. This is for individuals. Corporations have slightly different rules, but copyright is still for a single term.

   
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Old 01-26-2007, 01:24 PM   #10
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Default A single very long term

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U.S. Copyrights have not been renewable since 1967 when we adopted the “life plus n years” model for copyright terms. That n has changed, from 50 to 70 years. This is for individuals. Corporations have slightly different rules, but copyright is still for a single term.
It may be a single term, but it is a single very long term, making the public domain a long way back in time. We should remember that copyright extends to movies and recordings and other materials, not just books and magazines.
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