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Old 01-11-2007, 01:15 PM   #1
kev_taoboy
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Default JPG vs TIF in design programs

Hey all,

I've been doing ad design for newspapers in InDesign and Quark 4.0 on both Mac and PC for about 4 years or so.
Every JPG photo that comes my way I automatically convert it to TIF format to use it in whatever ad or layout I'm working on.

Recently someone with a fair amount of design experience asked me why I bothered converting the JPGs to TIFs, and said that JPGs work just as well.

I was about to defend my actions when I realized that I have no idea why they have to be converted - it was something I was taught in college to ALWAYS do, but no real explanation was ever given.

What's the consenus out there? In preparing documents for print on web press and occasionally full colour glossy presentations, is there any significant difference between using JPGs or TIFs?

It's really just an academic question for me, but I am genuinely curious.

Kev

   
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Old 01-11-2007, 02:11 PM   #2
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Well, apart from the loss of pixels when you resave JPEGs after working on them, you can get some very unpredictable colour shifts when you go to print. I started this thread on the topic in here a couple of years ago.

   
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Old 01-11-2007, 02:59 PM   #3
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Thanks for the re-direct. I did a quick readover of the thread - some interesting stuff. I guess the experienced gal who told me just to use JPGs was lucky to never experience such problems. Suprising, though. She'd been in the biz for at least 10 years.

   
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Old 01-11-2007, 05:47 PM   #4
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Being in the business for years does not mean she knows anything about images. I also always convert to TIF (or PSD). I don't want to introduce any additional artifacts into the image when I crop, resize, sharpen, etc. EVERY save to JPEG introduces new artifacts (or noise, or distortion). One often has to look closely at the JPEG to see these, but they are there.
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Old 01-11-2007, 07:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobRoosth View Post
Being in the business for years does not mean she knows anything about images.
"Do not make the mistake of assuming that one has twenty years of
experience when in truth one has the same year of experience repeated
twenty times.''

   
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Old 01-12-2007, 03:56 AM   #6
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That's not strictly true Bob: The artefacts are only introduced when you save and close the file. You can do as much as you want while it’s still in memory.
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Old 01-12-2007, 05:59 AM   #7
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Default JPEG Experience

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobRoosth View Post
Every save to JPEG introduces new artifacts (or noise, or distortion). One often has to look closely at the JPEG to see these, but they are there.
Bob,

That statement is my experience also. Zooming shows the pixels introduced when editing a JPEG image. That may not be so crucial when I use the edited JPG in a web context, but it is sure to be a problem when printing.

What I want to know is, should I convert a JPEG to a TIF (or other format) file when editing, and then go back to JPEG or GIF when done editing, so I have an image that can be used on the web?

David
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Old 01-12-2007, 07:03 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dthomsen8 View Post
What I want to know is, should I convert a JPEG to a TIF (or other format) file when editing, and then go back to JPEG or GIF when done editing, so I have an image that can be used on the web?
Yes, but don’t go back to GIF or JPEG — make a copy. Then keep the TIF so you can create other copies at whatever size or resolution you may need.

   
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Old 01-12-2007, 07:43 AM   #9
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Default TIF Scan

My HP scanner makes TIF images by default, which makes for rather large file sizes, but for quality, it may be for the best.

I am currently working on two scanned pictures of myself and my late brother, each at age 3, and each in the same sailor outfit, in b&w with hand coloring. This is work in Paint Shop Pro, not Photoshop, though.
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Old 01-12-2007, 08:49 AM   #10
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Always work with the best format for print first and then go to the compressed jpeg for the web. I usually work in TIF or layered PSD. I export/save for the web from there.

If the files as tiffs seem to be too big if you have software that allows you to apply LZW compression to the tiff, that works pretty well. I know that Photoshop does and Quark and InDesign can accept these files. I haven't had any print problems with the LZW compression on.

   
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