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Old 12-13-2006, 01:55 AM   #2
iamback
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel View Post
I must admit that I always dislike sloped romans. There is something almost unnatural and mechanical about roman letters that slant, for one thing. For another, I want italics to be distinguished from the roman text — they are meant for emphasis, after all.
I'm sure Italics are meant for emphasis - but you could use sloped romans for a very different purpose: as a design element with the "slope" matching other diagonals in an overall design, and they could be combined with upright forms of the same font. Surely not for book pages or magazine body text, but it could well be used very effectively for posters or packaging.

   
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