DTP


 
Lively discussions on the graphic arts and publishing — in print or on the web


Go Back   Desktop Publishing Forum > General Discussions > Print Design

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-29-2006, 03:15 PM   #1
don Arnoldy
Curmudgeon
 
don Arnoldy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 491
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarieMeyer View Post
Hi, I need to produce labels containing alpha-numeric codes that are easily readable at a bit more than arms length - say, 30 inches.
I just read about a designer who came up with a new design for prescription bottle lable--which was adopted by Target stores.

Here is an interview with her. You might look at the faces she used.

   
__________________
--don
don Arnoldy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2006, 09:37 PM   #2
iamback
Member
 
iamback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Posts: 4,894
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by don Arnoldy View Post
I just read about a designer who came up with a new design for prescription bottle lable--which was adopted by Target stores.

Here is an interview with her. You might look at the faces she used.
Interesting - but puzzling to me. She starts by explaining how her grandmother took a pill intended for her fgrandfather. Later on she sums up what goes on the label, primary and secondary information - but what is not in that information is the name of the patient! Are elderly patients expected to remember not only the name of all the medications they use (often a lot of different ones) but also in which dosis? It's quite possible husband and wife need the same medicine but in a different dosis (it could be the pills themselves that have different dosage, but each has to take an equal number per day!). Or both have different medicines but with similar-looking names. How does this label prevent mixups in such cases when the name of the patient is not on the label?

Here, the name of the patient is always on the medicine bottle/box label - and I cannot imagine any pharmacist leaving it out. Surely it must be part of the primary information.

   
__________________
Marjolein Katsma
Look through my eyes on Cultural Surfaces (soon!), My ArtFlakes shop and Flickr.
Occasionally I am also connecting online dots... and sometimes you can follow me on Marjolein's Travel Blog
iamback is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2006, 05:18 AM   #3
ktinkel
Founding Sysop
 
ktinkel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: In Connecticut, on the Housatonic River near its mouth at Long Island Sound.
Posts: 11,189
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamback View Post
Here, the name of the patient is always on the medicine bottle/box label - and I cannot imagine any pharmacist leaving it out. Surely it must be part of the primary information.
I haven’t seen these much-discussed Target medicine bottles, but in general the pharmacy always places the patient’s name on every bottle. It may even be a law.

Labels from some pharmacies could be better organized. But there is plenty of useful information on labels in general: drug name, including the brand name for reference even if the pill in the bottle is generic; dosage; number of pills; when to take them; whether the Rx can be refilled (and when); name of doctor (and some include his phone number). And then there are cautionary stickers about not operating machinery or telling us not to drink when taking the medication, that sort of stuff.

   
__________________
[SIZE=2][COLOR=LemonChiffon]::[/COLOR][/SIZE]
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
ktinkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2006, 05:56 AM   #4
iamback
Member
 
iamback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Posts: 4,894
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel View Post
I haven’t seen these much-discussed Target medicine bottles, but in general the pharmacy always places the patient’s name on every bottle. It may even be a law.
That would be a sensible law I did peer at the image but it was in fact rather blurry - but while I could make out a few elements (such as drug name, dosage, usage, and something that looks like Dr. so-and-so, I could not find anything that looked like a patient's name.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel
Labels from some pharmacies could be better organized. But there is plenty of useful information on labels in general: drug name, including the brand name for reference even if the pill in the bottle is generic; dosage; number of pills; when to take them; whether the Rx can be refilled (and when); name of doctor (and some include his phone number). And then there are cautionary stickers about not operating machinery or telling us not to drink when taking the medication, that sort of stuff.
Similar here (though as mentioned before, we don't use the expression "Rx" - but at least I now know what it means).

Looking at one now:
  • preprinted: Name of pharmacy, pharmacist, full address and phone number; the rest is computer-printed:
  • date + doctor's name
  • insurance company + a code (my card or policy number, I think)
  • my name, date of birth and address (street+number)
  • amount, name of drug + dosage (per capsule) and "cap" to indicate it's capsules
  • usage directions
The label is stuck onto (in this case) the original box so drug name/dosage/amount can be seen.

   
__________________
Marjolein Katsma
Look through my eyes on Cultural Surfaces (soon!), My ArtFlakes shop and Flickr.
Occasionally I am also connecting online dots... and sometimes you can follow me on Marjolein's Travel Blog
iamback is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2006, 06:04 AM   #5
donmcc
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Sarnia, Canada
Posts: 1,122
Default

> I did peer at the image but it was in fact rather blurry

At the top you can see the words Target Guest ... which I assume would be the client name. Of course, for privacy rules, they would not put a real person's name.
donmcc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2006, 06:17 AM   #6
Cristen Gillespie
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 814
Default

Quote:
Marjolein: I could not find anything that looked like a patient's name.
As Don said, "Target Guest." Quite obvious to those of us who know some people don't like to call their "guests" customers. Less hospitable <G> I find the redesign much easier than the standard label I get. Maybe I'll have to start going to Target for my medicine.

   
__________________
Cristen
Cristen Gillespie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2006, 06:30 AM   #7
ktinkel
Founding Sysop
 
ktinkel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: In Connecticut, on the Housatonic River near its mouth at Long Island Sound.
Posts: 11,189
Default

New York magazine article “The Perfect Prescription” discusses the Target pill bottle design project, and it has some comments on what the designer considered and rejected, along with pictures of some of our typical ordinary pill bottles.

Another article: “Target’s New Pill Bottle: Better Living Through Design

Most reports give this design high marks. Since I haven’t seen it it is hard to be sure. All the illustrations seem to show the same example, too. There is also a style for liquids.

   
__________________
[SIZE=2][COLOR=LemonChiffon]::[/COLOR][/SIZE]
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
ktinkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2006, 07:28 AM   #8
iamback
Member
 
iamback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Posts: 4,894
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cristen Gillespie View Post
As Don said, "Target Guest." Quite obvious to those of us who know some people don't like to call their "guests" customers. Less hospitable <G> I find the redesign much easier than the standard label I get. Maybe I'll have to start going to Target for my medicine.
Now you say the word, I can recognize it - but it was too blurry for me to just read.

Still weird the name wasn't mentioned as part of the "primary information" (or even the secondary information).

   
__________________
Marjolein Katsma
Look through my eyes on Cultural Surfaces (soon!), My ArtFlakes shop and Flickr.
Occasionally I am also connecting online dots... and sometimes you can follow me on Marjolein's Travel Blog
iamback is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2006, 07:44 AM   #9
iamback
Member
 
iamback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Amsterdam, NL
Posts: 4,894
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel View Post
New York magazine article “The Perfect Prescription” discusses the Target pill bottle design project, and it has some comments on what the designer considered and rejected, along with pictures of some of our typical ordinary pill bottles.
A much clearer picture - but amazingly, even here the patient's name on the bottle isn't mentioned. And color coding ... but no mention of color blindness: the printed name wil be needed! And six colors only - not for large families.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel
Not really, it just copied the text from the 2nd page of the New York magazine article - or both copied it from somewhere else (press release?).

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel
Most reports give this design high marks. Since I haven’t seen it it is hard to be sure. All the illustrations seem to show the same example, too. There is also a style for liquids.
But what about original packaging? Here, medicines are always delivered in their oiriginal packaging unless it needs to be repacked to give the customer a smaller quantity than available in packaging the manufacturer delivers. The original packaging also contains the (legally required) information sheet and expiration date.

Is Target repackaging everything (costly, time consuming, creating waste), or is the system totally different?

   
__________________
Marjolein Katsma
Look through my eyes on Cultural Surfaces (soon!), My ArtFlakes shop and Flickr.
Occasionally I am also connecting online dots... and sometimes you can follow me on Marjolein's Travel Blog
iamback is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2006, 09:57 AM   #10
gary
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: In the heart of Lake Minnetonka
Posts: 337
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by don Arnoldy View Post
Ia new design for prescription bottle lable--which was adopted by Target stores.
Been using them for a couple of years now. The green ring identifies it as my prescription - Bonnie's prescriptions have purple rings.

Because of the shape it can be a pain to get the last pill out sometimes...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	bottle.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	19.4 KB
ID:	740  
gary is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Labeling CDs terrie General Publishing Topics 28 06-13-2005 12:53 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Contents copyright 2004–2014 Desktop Publishing Forum and its members.