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Old 06-28-2006, 03:23 PM   #1
bmann
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Default Windows True Type on Mac OSX

So I'm working on this Quark 6.5 document that uses a font called Officina Sans ITC TT Book and it's a Windows True Type Font (TTF). I am working on Mac OSX.

If I make a text box and insert text "Option + u" and press "o", I get ö in Helvtica. When I change to my Windows TTF font, it changes to some S looking thing. So my question is, when you use a Windows TTF font, does it retain the Windows coding, therefore jacking up ALL of your accent marks and special characters?

Is there any way to change this back to a Mac encoding?

TIA
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Old 06-28-2006, 04:56 PM   #2
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Is there any way to change this back to a Mac encoding?

You're getting the Windows equivalent of Alt+0154, which is an s with a sort of v on top; in the Mac OS it would be an o-Umlaut. Those are the encodings of all old-style TTF and Type 1 fonts, and there's nothing much you can do about it. You'd get o-Umlaut if you could call up U+00F6, but QXP v. 6.5 doesn't support Unicode. You'll possibly get o-Umlaut if you type Option+0246, which is the Windows encoding that brings up U+00F6, but you'd have to do something similar for all the accented letters.

   
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Old 06-28-2006, 05:19 PM   #3
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Boy they don't want to make it easy for us, do they. I can see why OTF was invented. Well, these are documents that are already typed up and I didn't really want to find and replace every accent and odd character. I ended up taking the TTFs and converting them to Mac True Type fonts (tfil). Hopefully this is equivalent as far as printing. They seem to be working in the PDFs.
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Old 06-28-2006, 06:36 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmann
. . . when you use a Windows TTF font, does it retain the Windows coding, therefore jacking up ALL of your accent marks and special characters?
Wow! As I understood it, the wonder of OS X was that Windows TTF fonts would “just work” like a regular Mac font.

What TTF font are you using? Is it one that claims to have a full character set? Perhaps it is just missing the characters you need.

   
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Old 06-28-2006, 07:58 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel
Wow! As I understood it, the wonder of OS X was that Windows TTF fonts would “just work” like a regular Mac font.

What TTF font are you using? Is it one that claims to have a full character set? Perhaps it is just missing the characters you need.
This certainly was a unique situation in which the text was exported, translated, and then imported. I could tell in the returned XTG file that the special characters were coded with windows; the tag would say <\#246> aka Alt+246 (for o-umlaut) instead of the Mac code #154. With the Windows TTF font, I would see the correct characters on screen but when I printed a PDF they would look like the "Windows" characters, i.e. an S with the V on it insted of o-umlaut.

The only problem is that when I converted the XTG to Mac coding (and looked at the tags to verify) then the characters would look fine in say Arial but not the one font I needed.



Anyway, I basically figured it out by trial and error with maybe educated guesses guiding me...
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Old 06-29-2006, 06:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmann
Anyway, I basically figured it out by trial and error with maybe educated guesses guiding me...
Good. Glad something worked.

I hope you explained to the client or boss that you really performed heroically!

   
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Old 06-29-2006, 06:49 AM   #7
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So my question is now this, do Windows True Type fonts not have PostScript outlines? Is that why I could not make a PDF with that font?
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Old 06-29-2006, 08:05 AM   #8
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If the TT font does not have the "embeddable" flag set properly, it will not embed in a PDF created with Acrobat 5 or later.
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Old 06-29-2006, 08:42 AM   #9
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I can see why OTF was invented

You have to be careful: OTF is the file extension for all Open Type fonts with PS outlines, while TTF is still used for Open Type fonts with TrueType outlines. Either can be used on the Mac or Windows OSs, but you can't tell from the file name if a TTF font is of the old type (requiring Mac-TTF or Windows-TTF) or the newer Open Type TTF, which can be used by Mac or Windows.

Very confusing!

   
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Old 06-29-2006, 09:48 AM   #10
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So my question is now this, do Windows True Type fonts not have PostScript outlines? Is that why I could not make a PDF with that font?
Even Mac TrueType fonts lack PostScript outlines. That is basically the difference between PostScript Type 1 and TrueType fonts (on any platform).

It gets confusing with OpenType fonts because they come in two flavors: OTF, with a PostScript Type 1 outline within them; and plain OT fonts without (because they are TT fonts at heart).

But Windows TT fonts also may have limits on embedding that could prevent Acrobat from including them in your PDF.

It definitely is not getting simpler.


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