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Old 05-31-2006, 12:22 PM   #1
PeterArnel
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Default Today and Tonight

But then we have Yesterday and Yesterday Night but not Yesternight and we have Tuesday and Tuesday Night
Peter
Today I was writing lists for my day shift and my night shift

I headed one - Tuesday List and the Other Tuesday Night list
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Old 06-01-2006, 02:17 AM   #2
LoisWakeman
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But we do have yesteryear, not yesterweek or month! English is wonderful, but rather inconsistent.

I think the confusion is that 'day' is, to time, what 'man' is to humanity: a collective that stands for a whole subset. But it also refers to a specific part of time, and so is not always specified where the collective is already used (today = shorthand for today daytime, but could also be morning or afternoon or possibly evening). We do, however, have tonight.

I must get on with some work ...
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Old 06-01-2006, 03:48 AM   #3
dthomsen8
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Default German has more

In German, we can say morgen (tomorrow) or ubermorgen (the day after tomorrow, awkward), gestern (yesterday) or vorgestern (the day before yesterday). I hope I remember those spellings correctly, but English is awkward where German has a term.
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Old 06-01-2006, 05:21 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dthomsen8
In German, we can say morgen (tomorrow) or ubermorgen (the day after tomorrow, awkward), gestern (yesterday) or vorgestern (the day before yesterday). I hope I remember those spellings correctly, but English is awkward where German has a term.
You missed just one Umlaut: übermorgen. Then German also has Morgen (note the capital, it's a noun) for morning.

Dutch has the same convenient terms: morgen, overmorgen, gisteren and eergisteren. ''Eer" in this combination just means before, so besides "vorige week" (last week) we can also say "eervorige week" (the week before last). I'm not sure but I don't think even German can do this.

   
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