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Old 05-18-2006, 04:37 AM   #1
landon
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Default t'mill anyone?

Hi guys, i rarely surf the net, but does anyone knows what is t'mill? Is it a programs or a website?
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Old 05-18-2006, 05:28 AM   #2
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Hi guys, i rarely surf the net, but does anyone knows what is t'mill? Is it a programs or a website?
All I know is that there was a BBC radio program in the 1980s called “Trouble at T’Mill” andd there may have been a more recent TV program of the same name.

A web search also shows a British folk club or festival called “Folk at t’Mill” as well as a British book entitled Through T’Mill — could one of those be what you are asking about?

The Pseudo Dictionary site also defines it:
t’mill — A place where the people are revolting or on strike; a reference to the phrase “trouble at t’mill.”
Otherwise, no idea. Can you explain better what you want to know?

   
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Old 05-18-2006, 12:32 PM   #3
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Hi guys, i rarely surf the net, but does anyone knows what is t'mill? Is it a programs or a website?
"One of the flayrods's gone out of skew on the treadle."
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Old 05-18-2006, 12:53 PM   #4
Michael Rowley
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KT:

“Trouble at t’Mill”

The actual phrase that was said to be a stock line in plays featuring nineteenth century mill owners (always Lancashire or Yorkshire mill owners, whose business was spinning or weaving) was, 'There's trouble up at t'mill'. As the 't' is actually ellided following 'at', it sounded like 'up at mill'. The 'up' was a reference to the earlier days when mills were water-driven (much cheaper than steam), hence mills were often situated where the water was descending rapidly, constrained by the narrow clough. You needn't actually imitate a Lancashire or Yorkshire foreman: a stock 'northern' accent will do.

   
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Old 05-18-2006, 11:29 PM   #5
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thanks guys
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Old 05-19-2006, 04:33 AM   #6
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thanks guys
You’re welcome. But did any of it help?

   
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Old 05-19-2006, 06:45 AM   #7
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Definitely. You guys are so knowledgeable.
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