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Old 04-15-2006, 02:51 PM   #1
PeterArnel
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Default What are u reading now

WE have done this before but it always changes
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Old 04-15-2006, 03:09 PM   #2
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I'm rereading James Herriott's original series. Did "All Creatures Great & Small" last month and I'm almost finished with the second book, "All Things Bright & Beautiful." Two more to go in the series, then I'll probably pull out another old favorite from Emily Kimbrough and/or Cornelia Otis Skinner, or perhaps "Leaving Home" by Garrison Keillor. In the latter, one story that I keep marked to read when I could use a good laugh is "Homecoming." Guaranteed to get me into a helpless, soundless laughing fit complete with tears streaming from my eyes.

   
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Old 04-15-2006, 03:28 PM   #3
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Elyse
I havent readv "Herriott" - the TV series was brillaint - I dont know any of the others
Peter
It will be interesting to see what others read
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Old 04-15-2006, 03:42 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterArnel
the TV series was brillaint
I agree! I recall seeing the series for sale on DVD and/or video tape a while back. A friend about 50 minutes away in a city on the Mississippi River said every weekend friends from a couple of hours further east in Illinois used to drive with her husband and either stay with my friend or at a hotel for the express purpose of watching the television series. It wasn't available on any station in range of her rooftop antenna (this was before cable TV service was widely available and definitely before satellite TV service).

   
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Old 04-15-2006, 04:00 PM   #5
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One of the books I am reading is, Colonial Origins of the American Constitution: A Documentary History. Edited and with the introductory essay by Donald S. Lutz.

I paid $12 for this book, including shipping, and I can tell the publisher truly is a nonprofit organization. I only got the paperback edition, but it is elegant, the cover, even the interior cover design, the quality of paper, and the typesetting. (A real shame I'm going to mark it all up).

It has an interesting note on the last page. "This book was set in Adobe Garamond, a typeface adapted by Robert Slimbach from the original design of Claude Garamond, who, in the mid-sixteenth century, established what is thought to be the first type foundry. After his death in 1561 his types were dispersed and his designs were widely adapted. The beauty and legibility of Garamond's designs have inspired contemporary type designers to use them as models."

Hmm, it works so perfectly for me, because the book is primarily a compilation of important colonial legal documents, and I use a different type of rhythm in reading statutory matters. I have to concentrate differently, and then, I read much more slowly. However, I find that the font really does not work at all for me on the essay. The font seems to slow me down more than I want, as if the words are harder to make out than what I'm used to, and that seems to be related to the ratio of the ascenders to the x-height. Still, I have to assume the problem is me somehow, as the book is beautifully designed.

I've been reading biographies lately. All of them are on Englishmen. I also watched a video on the biography of Sir Walter Raleigh. You guys have some interesting historical characters over there, although I'll admit I read one, because he is family. My grandmother always told me to have an interest in him, when she would show me photos from the family album. Uncanny, to see the resemblances in such a historical figure -- Joseph Lister.

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Old 04-15-2006, 05:09 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterArnel
WE have done this before but it always changes
I always read several books at once (cannot recommend this, but keep falling into the trap).

Right now:

In my bedroom/bathroom: Julia Child’s autobiography, describing the development of her famous cookbooks; a collection of essays by A.J. Liebling; and a new book on InDesign: InDesign Type: Professional typography with Adobe InDesign CS2.

At my desk: Dowding’s Finer Points in the spacing & arrangement of type and Typography Papers No. 5. The latest in the Botswana Ladies detective series. And some other odds and ends.

Besides books: New York Times Magazine and Book Review; The Nation; The Week; The New Yorker; Fine Cooking; Threads (a sewing magazine); etc.

I should confess: I am a print junky, and am almost never anywhere without something to read. We used to joke here that Jack or I would read the back of the cereal box if nothing else is available. Sounds about right.

   
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Old 04-16-2006, 12:54 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterArnel
WE have done this before but it always changes
It's Easter and I work in a library, so have a stash of favourite crime authors to relax with. I started and finished Gone, by Jonathan Kellerman on Friday/Saturday, and am currently reading Eleven on top by Janet Evanovich, which is not one of her best, but fine for holiday reading. I've also got two new authors here, one of which I have started. It's The curious incident of the dog in the night-time by Mark Haddon – a Young Adult book that was recommended in Good Reading It won the Whitbread Book of the Year in 2003.

The other Good Reading recommendation and new author for me is Ismail Kadare's The successor, which I have yet to start.

Also on my bedside table and waiting to be read are:

Common murder – Val McDermid
With no one as witness – Elizabeth George
The pearl diver – Sujata Massey (also a new author to me)
Dead set – Kel Robertson (another new author)

   
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Old 04-16-2006, 07:29 PM   #8
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I thought primarily of recreational reading, so didn't include business-related books I've got in progress. For that let me add Buzz Marketing by Mark Hughes.

With my six year old son I'm reading The Horse and His Boy, book three of "The Chronicles of Narnia" by C.S. Lewis.

   
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Old 04-17-2006, 05:16 AM   #9
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It's The curious incident of the dog in the night-time by Mark Haddon – its based around Swindon (I live ouside) - I wasnt sure why it was targeted at young adults
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Old 04-17-2006, 07:39 AM   #10
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I just finished 'What The Dormouse Said' by John Markoff. A wonderful look at the cross pollination of the 60's counter-culture and the early personal computer industry. Before that it was 'The Making of the Atomic Bomb' by Richard Rhodes. Now rereading 'Eater' by Gregory Benford (Sci Fi)

I mostly read nonfiction: history, technology, business; and science fiction. I have read a lot about the history of the computer industry: mainframes, mini's and micro's. One of the reasons I have such a low opinion of Microsoft.

"Althrough it is now an article of faith that each new medium, whether the video camera or the VCR, finds early mass acceptance via pornography, SAIL (Sanford Artifical Intelligence Laboratory) achieved another less well known first, the details of which have long been shrouded in mystery. In 1971 or 1972, Stanford students, using ARPAnet accounts at SAIL, engaged in a commercial transaction with their counterparts at MIT. Before Amazon, before eBay, the seminal act of e-commerce was a drug deal. The students used the network to quietly arrange the sale of an undetermined amount of marijuana."
John Markoff

   
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