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Old 02-05-2006, 01:13 PM   #1
ktinkel
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Originally Posted by iamback
… various types of Dutch mustard, ranging from smooth and spicy to a very coarsely ground one …
I don’t think we get Dutch mustard here; have to keep an eye out for it.

We certainly get Dutch cheeses, however! You have wonderful cheese. I sometimes use really old Gouda instead of parmigiano Regianno — it is especially nice in risottos or grated over steamed cauliflower.

   
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Old 02-05-2006, 01:30 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by ktinkel
I don’t think we get Dutch mustard here; have to keep an eye out for it.
Maybe in one of those stores that have all the Dutch food, like licorice and beschuitjes?

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Originally Posted by ktinkel
We certainly get Dutch cheeses, however! You have wonderful cheese. I sometimes use really old Gouda instead of parmigiano Regianno — it is especially nice in risottos or grated over steamed cauliflower.
Do you really get really old Gouda there? I've never seen it - in fact whenever I was in the states I always had problems finding decent cheese, let alone good cheese. Mildly ripened Gouda was the oldest I could find and I specially brought really old Gouda from Amsterdam for my friends next time I went. So how old is your "really old"? ;-) There are sooo many types of cheese here, but we export only a few (as we do with beer: we tend to keep the best to ourselves)!

   
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Old 02-05-2006, 01:38 PM   #3
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I agree on the Dutch cheeses! My overall favorites ever since I discovered them.

   
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Old 02-05-2006, 02:23 PM   #4
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Do you really get really old Gouda there? I've never seen it - in fact whenever I was in the states I always had problems finding decent cheese, let alone good cheese.
We deal with the Darien Cheese shop, whose owners are dedicated to fabulous cheeses (and other wonderful foods). They sell only in the shop (no mail order).

Among Goudas, they have wonderful young ones, always from individual farmers; and old ones of several “ages.”

When I cannot get there, I sometimes order from an online retailer (iGourmet) that does pretty well (it does not compete with Ken at Darien, but I have never found anyone who does). I notice iGourmet now lists a new triple-aged Gouda as well as a couple of farmer-produced younger ones. And I see they now have a farmer-made Leyden, which is one of my secret pleasures (my husband dislikes cumin in cheese, though not in general; silly fellow! <g>).

But even more interesting in a way, many suburban supermarkets here now have real Dutch Gouda (instead of American copies) and most have “Old Amsterdam,” aged 12 months. (I suspect the latter may be a sort of export cheese, but it has very distinctive and good flavor.)

Offerings from Europe in general are improving, but since our government does not allow import of raw milk cheeses aged less than 90 days, French cheeses suffer quite a bit. Old Dutch, English, Irish, and Italian cheeses are usually a better bet.

And American artisan cheese-making is growing, too. Some of the cheeses we get from Vermont, New York state, and Oregon, especially, are very interesting.

   
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Old 02-05-2006, 03:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel
We deal with the Darien Cheese shop, whose owners are dedicated to fabulous cheeses (and other wonderful foods). They sell only in the shop (no mail order).
Aha! A real cheese shop!
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel
When I cannot get there, I sometimes order from an online retailer (iGourmet) that does pretty well (it does not compete with Ken at Darien, but I have never found anyone who does). I notice iGourmet now lists a new triple-aged Gouda as well as a couple of farmer-produced younger ones. And I see they now have a farmer-made Leyden, which is one of my secret pleasures (my husband dislikes cumin in cheese, though not in general; silly fellow! <g>).
I don't know the term "triple-aged" (as if it's something you do three times? You age cheese only once, for an X period). But I see:
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Extra Aged Gouda: Ripened for a full 18 months to develop a nutty, caramel-like flavor, this is the Gouda the Dutch keep for themselves!
True enough! That's ours! Give it back!

There are rules here, and cheese may only be called "old" when it's been aged for at least 9 months. I prefer 12 months or older, the older the better (older than 12 months is called "overjarig" - ripened for more than a year). One guy on the local market has a lovely overjarige Gouda-type farmer's cheese that falls apart when you try to cut it - lovely on dark rye bread! Or just by itself.

I like Leyden cheese, but like Frisian clove cheese even more: it has not only cumin seeds but cloves as well; best if well-ripened, at least old. Hard to get outside of Friesland though there is a cheese shop near by that has it (old Frisian). They have very old Leyden as well - I like it better that way than young, as my dad prefers it.

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Originally Posted by ktinkel
But even more interesting in a way, many suburban supermarkets here now have real Dutch Gouda (instead of American copies) and most have “Old Amsterdam,” aged 12 months. (I suspect the latter may be a sort of export cheese, but it has very distinctive and good flavor.)
No, that's a popular brand here, too. Popular enough that it's being imitated as well, with a similar black rind, same taste, but without the branding. And cheaper of course.

   
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Old 02-05-2006, 04:42 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktinkel
I sometimes use really old Gouda instead of parmigiano Regianno — it is especially nice in risottos or grated over steamed cauliflower.
Oo, YUM! Never thought to combine those two before!

   
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Old 02-05-2006, 05:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamback
I like Leyden cheese, but like Frisian clove cheese even more: it has not only cumin seeds but cloves as well; best if well-ripened, at least old. Hard to get outside of Friesland though there is a cheese shop near by that has it (old Frisian).
Is that this one? In fact, it caught my eye when I was poking around today. Not sure this has much age, but I will order some, anyway.

While I’m at it, I also ordered some Beauford d’Alpage and Chaumes from France. Having an expensive evening (stupid Super Bowl keeps me at the computer)!

BTW: Triple-aged Gouda is aged for 5 years, according to the web site.

   
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Old 02-05-2006, 05:47 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Franca
I agree on the Dutch cheeses! My overall favorites ever since I discovered them.
I have trouble declaring my overall favorite. I generally like cheeses.

When we are in France I love their cheeses, especially the trilogy from Normandy (one of my favorite places): camembert, pont-l’évêque (my favorite), and liverot (which can get quite raunchy, but is wonderful in France).

But when I taste these three here I am always disapointed. Our country’s misguided (IMO) insistence on pasteurized or over-aged cheeses is a catastrophe.

But never mind. When you are at Le Mans this year, take a side-trek up to Normandy, find a good place to eat, and finish the meal with that trinity of cheeses. You will be so happy …

   
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Old 02-05-2006, 06:14 PM   #9
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most have “Old Amsterdam,” aged 12 months. (I suspect the latter may be a sort of export cheese, but it has very distinctive and good flavor.)
Probably, but I love it.

   
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Old 02-05-2006, 06:26 PM   #10
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Probably, but I love it.
Me, too. However, if you ever get traditional aged Gouda, you will probably love that even more.

Old Amsterdam is a bit of a marketing construct. Brilliant, but not yet the end of the Gouda world!

   
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