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Old 01-27-2006, 07:32 AM   #1
dthomsen8
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Default Baby horses

My wife is taking an English course, and the instructor explained that a colt is a male baby horse. The dictionary says he is right, but what is a female baby horse?

I am sure one of our horse experts will explain this to me.
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Old 01-27-2006, 08:04 AM   #2
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Try Filly

   
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Old 01-27-2006, 09:20 AM   #3
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David - all you wanted to know and a lot more you didn't is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse#W...ting_to_horses

Neigh, lad
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Old 01-27-2006, 12:18 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dthomsen8
My wife is taking an English course, and the instructor explained that a colt is a male baby horse. The dictionary says he is right, but what is a female baby horse?

I am sure one of our horse experts will explain this to me.
They're known as fillies until they're four. Once a colt has been gelded,however, he is known as a gelding, no matter how young he is.

   
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Old 01-27-2006, 01:43 PM   #5
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And then there are the gender non-specific terms: foal, for a baby horse prior to weaning, weanling for that period between weaning and 1 yr. old, at which point you can say yearling! Then there's 'coming yearling', 'long yearling' ... and if you really want to be confused - in this country western cowboys/trainers often call any unbroke youngster (male or female, gelded or not) a colt.

So Dave, if you're still reading, aren't you glad you asked?

   
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Old 01-27-2006, 02:18 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Franca
And then there are the gender non-specific terms: foal, for a baby horse prior to weaning, weanling for that period between weaning and 1 yr. old, at which point you can say yearling! Then there's 'coming yearling', 'long yearling' ... and if you really want to be confused - in this country western cowboys/trainers often call any unbroke youngster (male or female, gelded or not) a colt.
Yes, that use of colt confused me for many years!

Then there's 'rising four' for a three year old just short of its fourth birthday (for example). This is mostly used for youngsters, especially when they were born late in the season, indicating that they are younger than their official age.

Oh, and Dave, the official horse's birthday in the Northern hemisphere is 1st January, although most are born between February and April, or even into May.

In the southern hemisphere, the official birthday is 1st August. Horses are never, ever, born in July.

Are you completely confused yet?

   
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Old 01-27-2006, 02:42 PM   #7
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Ann:

'no matter how young he is'

Surely, no breeder would ever be so pessimistic as to let his colt be gelded before it is about three?

   
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Old 01-27-2006, 03:03 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
Surely, no breeder would ever be so pessimistic as to let his colt be gelded before it is about three?
Apart from racing thoroughbreds, most colts here are gelded when they're a few months old. I only ever bred one colt, but he was gelded at about four months. That stopped him climbing the fences into the neighbouring paddocks.

He then grew to be 16.2hh, and was the tallest endurance horse in Queensland. He competed at the top level until he was about 15, gaining 7th in the 160km Quilty endurance ride at the age of 14 – in Western Australia, a round trip to compete of something like 12,000 km. And no, I don't regret gelding him young. He was by a purebred Arabian out of a stockhorse mare of unknown parentage, and therefore ineligible by lack of pedigree to be a serving stallion.

Even the racehorses here are often gelded before their first race.

   
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Old 01-28-2006, 07:51 AM   #9
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Ann:

'most colts here are gelded when they're a few months old'

I only know what was the general practice twenty years ago in Germany: there, the farmers (most of the breeders were farmers) believed that male horses would develop properly unless they were entire, so gelding was left until after the inspectors had delivered their verdicts as to whether the horse could become a state-registered stallion or not, and that was not decided until the animal was nearly four.

'That stopped him climbing the fences into the neighbouring paddocks'

Yes, I can see the point of that. I know of a case where a one-yearold colt got into the field where there several mares, and the owners of two them (it was a livery stable) were very both surprised an annoyed when they discovered their mares were expecting little bundles of joy.

   
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Old 01-28-2006, 11:07 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
gelding was left until after the inspectors had delivered their verdicts as to whether the horse could become a state-registered stallion or not, and that was not decided until the animal was nearly four.
The German breed societies still work that way, but I think you'll find that only the colts the farmers (and the studs, as they now have major studs as the rest of the world does) will have culled those not considered good enough by gelding them and selling them on.

   
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