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Old 01-17-2006, 02:52 PM   #1
PeterArnel
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Default Advice to pro photographers

I need some help - I want to create a fact sheet to help the photographers who supply digital images of "POSH" houses to us
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Old 01-17-2006, 02:58 PM   #2
terrie
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What do you want to know?

I'd probably specify:

1. The min and max image dimensions--ppi/dpi, pixel width/height

2. The acceptable image format--PSD, TIFF, JPG (quality level?),

3. RGB or CMYK?

4. Embed profile or not? Or do you provide a profile?

5. Transmit via email or ftp or cd or ?

That help?

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Old 01-17-2006, 03:12 PM   #3
PeterArnel
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Terrie
They are questions I want answers :-) in simple terms for them (bless them)
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Old 01-17-2006, 03:18 PM   #4
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peter: They are questions I want answers :-) in simple terms for them (bless them)
Well...what are your printing specs?

How small or big can images be--as in pixel dimensions--so that they print properly?

Do you use color management and if so, do you have a profile you would prefer they use or should they embed their own working space profile and then you guys convert on the fly?

Do you care what image format they use--I can see someone sending you an jpg compressed to quality 1 with all sorts of artifacts and uglies expecting it to be printed full page glossy.

Unless you tell them, how are they to know what you want?

Tell me what your specs are and I'll come up with something...

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Old 01-17-2006, 03:31 PM   #5
PeterArnel
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OK
this is what I think i know ( or gleaned)

if they look at pics the should always work in Adobe rgb 1998

if they retouch the image the should save it in CMYK (ISO coated for Europe)

Be wary of retouching using "Calibrated" Monitors as they show false readings

Images should be enlarged no more than 130%???? ( this was my tranny spec - how does this apply tro digital )

low Jpeg compression has little effect on quality

Where does RAW filoe format fit in

Peter
How do they calibrate the camera ????
Nite nite
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Old 01-17-2006, 04:19 PM   #6
terrie
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peter: if they look at pics the should always work in Adobe rgb 1998
Fairly standard...

>>if they retouch the image the should save it in CMYK (ISO coated for Europe)

Why? Why don't you guys do the conversion from RGB with the AdobeRGB98 profile embedded?


>>Be wary of retouching using "Calibrated" Monitors as they show false readings

False to whom? If you are using calibrated monitors, the image should look the same--at least in RGB...my experience with CMYK is very limited. The whole point of color management as it relates to monitors is that an image shown on a calibrated monitor should look the same across all calibrated monitors--otherwise what's the point?

Basically what you are doing when you use color management is creating a series of dictionary entries that allow the color management system to translate from one system to another.


>>Images should be enlarged no more than 130%???? ( this was my tranny spec - how does this apply tro digital )

130% of what???


>>low Jpeg compression has little effect on quality

Why not? If you are taking a low quality jpg at a low res value and trying to blow it up to higher res, how can you not have artifact problems? Or is it that the photographers are using decent (as in say at least 5mp) cameras? Or your final image size is very small???


>>Where does RAW filoe format fit in

RAW allows the photographer greater flexibility in terms of processed image both in size and image "quality" (for example, using RAW one can play with the white balance in the most amazing way).


>>How do they calibrate the camera ????

If they are shooting outdoors, it's my understanding that camera calibration is pretty useless--check the archives of the colorsync list for quite lengthy discussions on this. If doing a studio shoot, calibration can be useful because in a studio shoot one can control the lighting.

I saw your post on the colorsync list. You might ask this question there also...

Hope this helps...

Terrie
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Old 01-18-2006, 10:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
if they look at pics the should always work in Adobe rgb 1998
Adobe RGB is a good working space for print production, but not necessarily for a pro photographer. They may want to work in a wider gamut space which probably entails working in 16-bit/channel too. As long as they supply 8-bit RGB files tagged withthe correct profile.
Quote:
if they retouch the image the should save it in CMYK (ISO coated for Europe)
Photographers should never ever, under any circumstances, convert anything to CMYK (IMHO).
Quote:
Be wary of retouching using "Calibrated" Monitors as they show false readings
Eh? Only a calæibrated monitor has a chance of showing correct picture. But a calibrated workflow is only as good as its weakest link, so scanner, monitor and proof printer all need to be calibrated to the same standards.
Quote:
Images should be enlarged no more than 130%
According to a photographer friend of mine digital photos (from a high-res pro camera) can be scaled far more aggressively (300% or more) than a comparably sized 'analogue' photo. Digital photos don't have 'grain', although other artifacts can appear if the CCD or lens is of less good quality or size.
Quote:
low Jpeg compression has little effect on quality
Yes, as long as one does not repeatedly save as JPEG.
Quote:
Where does RAW filoe format fit in - How do they calibrate the camera
The two are interconnected. The RAW file is simply 'what the ccd saw' with the camera's properties or calibration tagged on separately so when imported into Photoshop the conversion from raw pixel data to calibrated image is under control of the photographer rather than the camera's software.

   
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Old 01-19-2006, 10:08 AM   #8
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ian: Adobe RGB is a good working space for print production, but not necessarily for a pro photographer.
I was thinking print production and didn't want to complicate matters figuring the photographer might do a conversion to AdobeRGB98 when sending to print...


>>Photographers should never ever, under any circumstances, convert anything to CMYK (IMHO).

That's what I've always read--I don't have any experience working with CMYK and until I gain some, I'd feel more comfortable providing profiled RGB files.

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Old 01-19-2006, 04:28 PM   #9
Cristen Gillespie
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ProPhoto RGB is probably a bit too wide a space for CMYK conversion by Peter to print. But then sRGB is probably closer to CMYK printing than Adobe RGB. If the photog does color correction, perhaps he/she should send LAB and let Peter do the converting? Then there is no problem with the numbers, no matter how calibrated or not the monitors/cameras are? And no reason to expect a pro photographer to know how to properly make the CMYK conversion.

   
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Old 01-19-2006, 10:00 PM   #10
Ian Petersen
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But then sRGB is probably closer to CMYK printing than Adobe RGB
Perhaps, but sRGB is a poor working space for print production and I've certainly never seen it recommended for such. However, it can be useful to convert PDFs and images to sRGB when sending to clients for proofing purposes as it is closer to the 'average' PC screen.
Quote:
If the photog does color correction, perhaps he/she should send LAB and let Peter do the converting? Then there is no problem with the numbers, no matter how calibrated or not the monitors/cameras are?
If the photographer's screen isn't calibrated properly then he's still going to be sending wierd looking pictures whether in Lab or RGB. And if the designer/printer's screen is not calibrated then he's not going to know what he's converting from or to ...

   
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