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Old 11-05-2005, 02:52 PM   #1
Robin Springall
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Default Why does CS2 update text?

Pardon me if this doesn't make much sense, but I've just staggered back home from a party and I'm rather the worse for wear and I meant to ask this one before: what happens when you open an older file in Illustrator CD2 or InDesign CS2 and you see a window saying that the program is updating legacy text (or words to that effect?)
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Old 11-05-2005, 04:26 PM   #2
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Robin:

the program is updating legacy text

It means that the digital code is being converted to digital code that CS2 can understand. I think if you save the file then, it will no longer be read by CS or earlier programs. Nothing to worry about.

   
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Old 11-07-2005, 01:03 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
Nothing to worry about.
For a moment I thought that Adobe were resurrecting that long tradition of reflowing and changing the spacing of text with every upgrade!

   
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Old 11-07-2005, 01:29 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Mike
...reflowing and changing the spacing of text with every upgrade!
Oh, don't! Luckily we haven't seen that at my place for a few years.

Thanks, Mike. Just it's a worrying dialog box: if it's updating and you can't do anything about it, I'd prefer the program not to tell me!
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Old 11-08-2005, 02:35 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Springall
what happens when you open an older file in Illustrator CD2 or InDesign CS2 and you see a window saying that the program is updating legacy text (or words to that effect?)
That's in Illustrator, where the text engine was rewritten in CS. You can say no and things will remain as they are, but bits of legacy text can't be changed until they are updated.

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Old 11-30-2005, 07:27 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Robin Springall
Thanks, Mike. Just it's a worrying dialog box: if it's updating and you can't do anything about it, I'd prefer the program not to tell me!
There's a simple work-around. Double-click to open the document and rush out to get a coffee. On the way ask a colleague to watch your machine and dismiss any dialogue boxes that appear.

   
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Old 12-17-2005, 08:28 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Shane Stanley
That's in Illustrator, where the text engine was rewritten in CS. You can say no and things will remain as they are, but bits of legacy text can't be changed until they are updated.

Shane

Hi Shane,

at least Indesign does a "conversion" every time you open an older document.
This was in every release the case and often this is a lengthy process.
I don't like that much and wonder why such an old beast like QuarkXPress (using the old fashioned spaghetti code paradigm; so some critics) does not require this.
Based on the Adobe marketing i was thinking that object oriented programming should prevent this "mess".
To clarify: I like Indesign very much, but this "feature" not; though it does a good job in converting, it takes too long.

Thomas
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Old 12-18-2005, 02:05 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tkaltschmidt
at least Indesign does a "conversion" every time you open an older document.
As far as I'm aware, the conversion doesn't happen unless you actually change a story.

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Originally Posted by tkaltschmidt
I don't like that much and wonder why such an old beast like QuarkXPress (using the old fashioned spaghetti code paradigm; so some critics) does not require this.
QXP keeps using the text flow code of the version the document was initially created in (unless you open it holding the option key). This certainly has some advantages. But it also means that if you copy and paste a story from one document to another, there can be subtle changes due to reflow. (There are also related issues to do with scripting and flow code that have been the stuff of nightmares.)

For InDesign to use the same process, for example, any documents from a version before the paragraph composer was introduced would not have access to it.

The real secret of QXP's seeming success in this area is simple: in all the years, they've done next to nothing to improve their lousy composition engine, so the problems of their method are, to most users, theoretical to the point of being largely unknown.

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Old 12-19-2005, 11:36 PM   #9
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As far as I'm aware, the conversion doesn't happen unless you actually change a story.
Hi Shane,

this is the case in Illustrator CS/CS2, in Indesign older documents will be converted upon opening in a newer version.

Additionally i doubt that the text composition/reflow engine (which certainly is better in Indesign) is so highly connected to the file format, that the file format needs big changes every time you update some composition features.
And this was my point; in other words: Why does Indesign change their file format with every release? (So a conversion of older documents is needed).

Only a little point, of course: Indesign has so many advantages compared to XPress, i can life with that little issue... ;-)

Thomas
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Old 12-20-2005, 02:18 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tkaltschmidt
in Indesign older documents will be converted upon opening in a newer version.
I think we've been talking at cross purposes; the original post was about text being updated, but yes, the document is converted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tkaltschmidt
And this was my point; in other words: Why does Indesign change their file format with every release? (So a conversion of older documents is needed).
I guess because they can see where improvements can be made. Given they don't support direct saving back to previous versions, there's no real reason not to.

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