DTP


 
Lively discussions on the graphic arts and publishing — in print or on the web


Go Back   Desktop Publishing Forum > General Discussions > The Corner Pub

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-30-2005, 06:13 PM   #1
Hugh Wyn Griffith
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,459
Default How do you say @ in Catalan?

Here's a delightful website written up in our local paper recently but probably syndicated:
http://www.herodios.com/atsign.htm
A Natural History of the @ Sign
Part One: The many names of @



   
__________________


Hugh
Hugh Wyn Griffith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 08:40 AM   #2
Michael Rowley
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ipswich (the one in England)
Posts: 5,105
Default

Hugh:

Although the change from at meaning "for a given amount per" to at meaning "in a specified (electronic) location" comes fairly naturally to English speakers

This English speaker would find it strange to say for a given amount per instead of saying the English 'at' or the Latin 'ad': I suppose that that long-winded version comes from the same stable as 'at this moment in time'.

   
__________________
Michael
Michael Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 12:40 PM   #3
Hugh Wyn Griffith
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,459
Default

I think you missed the word "meaning" -- explanations usually are longer than the symbol, word or phrase being explained.
eg:

ad
An advertisement; advertising.
small ad: see SMALL adjective.

Comb.: name="1"adman a person who produces advertisements commercially; name="2"admass the section of the community regarded as readily influenced by advertising etc.


   
__________________


Hugh
Hugh Wyn Griffith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 01:14 PM   #4
Michael Rowley
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ipswich (the one in England)
Posts: 5,105
Default

Hugh:

Sorry, I meant to say that in English, '@' means 'at', although it is probably a form of 'ad'. Similarly, '&' means 'and', although it is certainly a form of 'et' (and is described in some languages as the 'et-sign'. I don't think either @ or & needs a longer explanation than 'at' or 'and'.

   
__________________
Michael
Michael Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 03:15 PM   #5
Hugh Wyn Griffith
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,459
Default

Test post

   
__________________


Hugh
Hugh Wyn Griffith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 03:16 PM   #6
Hugh Wyn Griffith
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,459
Default

OK that Test Post fixed it and I can see the thread tree.

   
__________________


Hugh
Hugh Wyn Griffith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 03:18 PM   #7
Hugh Wyn Griffith
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,459
Default

I know what you meant <g>

The point is that not everyone knows what @ means -- or that # is the hash mark and not a pound sign <g>

   
__________________


Hugh
Hugh Wyn Griffith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 06:26 PM   #8
jrabold
Member
 
jrabold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Oakland California USA
Posts: 63
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Wyn Griffith
... # is the hash mark and not a pound sign ...
Hash mark? Oh, you mean the octothorpe!

   
__________________
John Rabold
jrabold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2005, 06:36 PM   #9
Hugh Wyn Griffith
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,459
Default

Despite its intriguing history

http://www.sigtel.com/tel_tech_octothorpe.html

I have to go back to my signal corps days and stick with hash mark -- I see Europe wants to call it a square ......

   
__________________


Hugh
Hugh Wyn Griffith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2005, 07:43 AM   #10
ktinkel
Founding Sysop
 
ktinkel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: In Connecticut, on the Housatonic River near its mouth at Long Island Sound.
Posts: 11,189
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Wyn Griffith
The point is that not everyone knows what @ means -- or that # is the hash mark and not a pound sign <g>
It is not the pound sign, of course, but # is a shortcut way of indicating pound/pounds.

Automated phone systems call it the pound sign — but what else can they call it? Tic-tac-toe? Cross-hatch? Octothorpe? I rather doubt it.

They also call the asterisk a star, which it certainly is not!

   
__________________
[SIZE=2][COLOR=LemonChiffon]::[/COLOR][/SIZE]
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
ktinkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Contents copyright 2004–2014 Desktop Publishing Forum and its members.