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Old 10-22-2005, 12:48 AM   #1
Mike
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Default New Hart's Rules

I spotted this in this week's World Wide Words (http://www.worldwidewords.org)

NEW HART'S RULES Hart's Rules is a famous handbook, first produced
in 1893 by Horace Hart, the Printer to the University of Oxford, as
a guide for compositors and proofreaders at the University Press.
The most recent edition, the 39th, came out in 1983 and is still in
print. Despite the title, this book isn't those Hart's Rules in
anything but name, "Hart" now having become a brand, like "Fowler".
It is instead an adaptation and reduction to smaller physical size
of the Oxford Guide to Style, compiled by R M Ritter, which came
out as recently as 2002. Despite its confusing publishing history,
this is a useful little style guide, much more wide-ranging than
the current edition of the original Hart's Rules.

[New Hart's Rules; published by Oxford University Press; hardback,
pp417; ISBN 0198610416; list price GBP12.99.]

   
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Old 10-22-2005, 04:41 AM   #2
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Mike:

There's also this, published the same day:

42New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors The Essential A-Z Guide to the Written Word(First Edition)
Publication Date: 22 September 2005
£12.99 Hardback 0-19-861040-8

It used to be called Collin's Dictionary.

   
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Old 10-22-2005, 07:12 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike
I spotted this … NEW HART'S RULES
There you go again, spending my money for me! <g>

I love the old Hart’s Rules, even though many of the specific guidelines do not apply in the U.S. But there is something about the succinctness and no-waffling style that appeals very much.

So I just went and ordered it. Amazon says it has not been released yet. But I can wait.

   
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Old 10-22-2005, 08:23 AM   #4
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I apologize for the misplaced apostrophe: the author of the Authors and Printers Dictionary, which became The Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors (I presume printers are assumed to have become perfect spellers, or else they just print what's given to them) was F. Howard Collins.

   
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Old 11-15-2005, 12:11 PM   #5
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KT:

Amazon says it has not been released yet

I ordered it on Friday from Amaazon and it was in this morning's post.

I have started reading it, and it still seems to be a little behind the times, for it speaks of the 'author's disk', although a lot of authors will by now have computers (epecially Macs!) without a floppy disk. In writing about corrections, it still assumes that all copy-editing is done on paper, and the same goes for initial proofreading.

Apropos proofreading, it gives the proof-correction marks of BS 5261:2005, which as far as I can see differ only from those given in BS 5261:1976 in the new marks for em-spaces, en-spaces, thin spaces (as defined by printers and in the UK), and fixed spaces—the previous version said only, 'Give the size of the space to be inserted when necessary'.

   
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Old 11-15-2005, 12:31 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
I have started reading it, and it still seems to be a little behind the times …
Mine came last week, and I have been reading at it, and found some oddities as well.

But all in all, it is pretty good. And I am glad to see that it tries to sort out the different British and U.S. practices.

But I still am annoyed by some of the typographic advice. They (and the Chicago Manual and other usage guides) cause a lot of trouble for typographers who know what they are doing with all the specific rules for counting hyphens, insisting on em dashes set tight, and other details that should be left to the judgment of someone who knows what she is doing (and understands the virtues and limitations of the font and software in use, and the constraints of a preset layout)!

I really love it when I take pains with something and get it in pretty good shape only to have some hyphen-counting client come along, waving one of these books, and insisting that I screw it up. Hrrrrmph.

Oh, well. <g> Fortunately, I am basically retired, and at no one’s beck and call.

   
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Old 11-15-2005, 02:43 PM   #7
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KT:

They . . . cause a lot of trouble for typographers who know what they are doing with all the specific rules for counting hyphens, insisting on em dashes set tight

You're probably judgeing (or 'judging' for Americans, I've read) the book too harshly, for it actually says em dashes set tight are an editor's decision and the number of consecutive hyphens ('usually not more than three or four') is a matter for the 'house rules'. But we all have our foibles, and my wrath was roused by a remark that breaking words at the end of unjustified lines is not or seldom necessary; that's piffle (that way your Flattersatz really can be translated as 'ragged').

I suppose we don't give enough weight to a statement at the beginning of the book, viz that these are the house rules of OUP.

   
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Old 11-15-2005, 11:45 PM   #8
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*** Apropos proofreading ***

What do they do these days to avoid 'windows' in the printed text, where word spaces on subsequent lines form an ugly white patch on the printed column?

   
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