DTP


 
Lively discussions on the graphic arts and publishing — in print or on the web


Go Back   Desktop Publishing Forum > General Discussions > Fonts & Typography

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-23-2005, 12:53 PM   #1
Howard White
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hudson, MA
Posts: 183
Default Identify this one?

Here's another font ID request from an IRC group I hang out in. "Cathedral T" is one of the proposals so far...

HW
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	kirun.jpg
Views:	288
Size:	5.6 KB
ID:	210  
Howard White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2005, 03:10 PM   #2
ElyseC
Sysop Emeritus
 
ElyseC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: southeastern Iowa, in the technology corridor
Posts: 2,190
Default

It reminds me most of Meta, but also of Syntax. Neither one looks like a match, but try looking at this MyFonts.com search and plugging in "cathedralcenter" for the sample text there while you're at it.

   
__________________
Elyse
ElyseC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2005, 06:40 PM   #3
ktinkel
Founding Sysop
 
ktinkel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: In Connecticut, on the Housatonic River near its mouth at Long Island Sound.
Posts: 11,189
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Howard White
Here's another font ID request from an IRC group I hang out in. "Cathedral T" is one of the proposals so far...
Sure beats me. I have specimens of quite a few sans serifs, but looking at the key characters (a, h/d, c) — and lacking the really useful g and w — I do not find a match. And I would not pretend to be keeping up with this tribe, as they seem to hatch out a dozen a month!

Here are some I am sure it is not:
  • TheMix
  • Syntax
  • Fedra
  • Lucida Sans Narrow
  • Quay Sans
  • Alinea Sans
  • Claude Sans
  • Trade Gothic
The distinctive features are:
  • the tiny bowl of the a
  • the attack of the h, d, and n (where the arch leaves the stem)
  • the narrowness of r and t
How close must it be? Take a look at some of the near misses — see if any will do.

   
__________________
[SIZE=2][COLOR=LemonChiffon]::[/COLOR][/SIZE]
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
ktinkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2005, 02:51 PM   #4
Michael Rowley
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ipswich (the one in England)
Posts: 5,105
Default

KT:

Take a look at some of the near misses

Stepping in where experts fear to tread, what about Myriad?

   
__________________
Michael
Michael Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2005, 06:33 PM   #5
ktinkel
Founding Sysop
 
ktinkel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: In Connecticut, on the Housatonic River near its mouth at Long Island Sound.
Posts: 11,189
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
… what about Myriad?
No. Compare the shape of the arch in h and n; the angle of the downward part of the bowl on the a, the width and curvature of the bottom of the t; and so on.

Alas.

   
__________________
[SIZE=2][COLOR=LemonChiffon]::[/COLOR][/SIZE]
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
ktinkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2005, 08:53 AM   #6
Michael Rowley
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ipswich (the one in England)
Posts: 5,105
Default

KT:

Compare the shape of the arch in h and n; the angle of the downward part of the bowl on the a, the width and curvature of the bottom of the t; and so on

Probably it's things like that that make you the expert and me the . . .

   
__________________
Michael
Michael Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2005, 09:00 AM   #7
ktinkel
Founding Sysop
 
ktinkel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: In Connecticut, on the Housatonic River near its mouth at Long Island Sound.
Posts: 11,189
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
Probably it's things like that that make you the expert and me the . . .
Do not think it calls for much expertise, but it does call for making your mind and eye focus on very tiny details.

When it comes to sans serif faces, which emerge almost daily, like toadstools in the lawn, you have to peer closely at tiny details. Otherwise it is hopeless. Actually, as we see here, it is nearly hopeless anyway.

I once as an experiment took a dozen sans faces and swapped their caps to see if it made any serious difference. Very few, and none really significant. The only difficulty was line weight — that is where the variations are likely to occur in roman sans serifs.

The most distinctive parts of modern sans serif families are the italics. Pity we rarely get requests to identify those!

   
__________________
[SIZE=2][COLOR=LemonChiffon]::[/COLOR][/SIZE]
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
ktinkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2005, 09:11 AM   #8
Michael Rowley
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ipswich (the one in England)
Posts: 5,105
Default

KT:

The most distinctive parts of modern sans serif families are the italics

Many (most?) sans serif faces seem to have only sloped roman, so would their 'italic' help very much?

   
__________________
Michael
Michael Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2005, 10:02 AM   #9
ktinkel
Founding Sysop
 
ktinkel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: In Connecticut, on the Housatonic River near its mouth at Long Island Sound.
Posts: 11,189
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
Many (most?) sans serif faces seem to have only sloped roman, so would their 'italic' help very much?
Some do, but the so-called humanist sans are likely to have cursive italics for key lowercase characters — typically, a, b, e, f, g, p, w, y (and perhaps others, including k, q, v, w).

Some are more cursive than others, and the f, particularly, may offer clues for identifying a sans serif face.

   
__________________
[SIZE=2][COLOR=LemonChiffon]::[/COLOR][/SIZE]
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
ktinkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2005, 11:42 AM   #10
Michael Rowley
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Ipswich (the one in England)
Posts: 5,105
Default

KT:

but the so-called humanist sans are likely to have cursive italics for key lowercase characters

Agreed, but Optima (which Typophile doesn't recognize as a humanist sans, but many do) hasn't had a proper italic until recently, and many seriffed romans have none.

Perhaps one should devise a logo that has all the more recognizable letters in it, so that designers could imitate it exactly.

   
__________________
Michael
Michael Rowley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Identify odd font? jwoolf09 Fonts & Typography 20 05-30-2007 06:41 AM
Identify Mac or PC inDesign doc AndreCampeau Print Design 28 06-22-2006 02:43 PM
Just One More Font to Identify !! tatesha Fonts & Typography 1 09-09-2005 11:27 AM
Identify this font Howard White Fonts & Typography 3 09-06-2005 06:17 AM
Identify font? JohnC Fonts & Typography 1 04-19-2005 11:47 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Contents copyright 2004–2014 Desktop Publishing Forum and its members.