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Old 10-28-2017, 12:05 PM   #1
Ronald
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Default Question: Using Vintage TV in Set Design

I'm helping someone with their YouTube podcast set design. I'd like to incorporate a stylish mid-century CRT TV set, having the guest's name appear on the old, round monitor. I know it's possible to have a TV serve as a PC monitor with the right cables, but let's assume the TV doesn't function anymore. Would it still be possible to project words within the old monitor somehow, perhaps gutting it and putting a PC monitor inside or something? As you probably assumed, I know very little about CRT TVs.

Any tips would be appreciated.
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Old 10-29-2017, 08:26 AM   #2
Steve Rindsberg
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I'd photograph the tv as is, then use your preferred image editor to add the text to the tv screen.

Depending on how old the tv is, there may not be anyplace to connect cables, by the way. Moot point in this case, since the tv doesn't work. ;-)

   
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Old 11-01-2017, 01:35 PM   #3
don Arnoldy
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When you try to put TV that is displaying an image on TV...most of the time, you get a "rolling" effect because of the scan rates of the images. Its sorta like the video equivalent of Moire when you re-screen a halftone.

If the TV you want to use in truly non-functional, pull out the picture tube and replace it with a transparency of the image you want to display--then back light that.

It should photograph better that way.

   
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Old 11-01-2017, 05:36 PM   #4
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Unless you really know what you're doing, I'd be reluctant to mess about in the innards of a tube tv. I've heard some stories of those things storing a hefty charge for ridiculously long times.

   
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Old 11-02-2017, 01:10 AM   #5
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I had an experience of that many years ago. Managed to touch something I shouldn't have touched - fortunately not one of the lethal bits. My whole arm got numb and I ended up sitting on the floor in front of the set, gasping for breath for a while.

Never touched anything inside a TV since.

   
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Old 11-02-2017, 07:52 AM   #6
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I'm glad I learned this lesson from many many similar stories instead of having to acquire the knowledge ... um ... manually. ;-)

   
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Old 11-02-2017, 02:03 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
Unless you really know what you're doing, I'd be reluctant to mess about in the innards of a tube tv.
Always good advice!

My point was about not trying to make a video of a working CRT...

But, if you don't know what you are doing, have someone who does do the removing of the guts.

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Old 11-02-2017, 09:46 PM   #8
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Thanks for all the info, gentlemen! Yeah, I didn't consider the rolling effect that TVs have when filmed, or that a 60 year-old TV might not even have the proper ports to connect a computer to it. People who've made YouTube videos showing how they did it appear to have TVs from the '70s or '80s, which is newer than what I have in mind.

I have read a little about TVs holding a mean charge, so thanks for mentioning that. So far it doesn't sound like it would be lethal, but it's not something I have experience with and would rather avoid.

Although it feels like a slight cop-out, superimposing graphics in post with After Effects isn't a bad idea either. I had someone suggest that on another forum. I'm losing a bit of hope that I'll even find the kind of stylish old TV I'm looking for; they can be pricey, and on Ebay, most listings are pickup only. I had one bite on Craig's List, then he didn't respond. I'll keep my eyes open though.
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Old 11-03-2017, 12:26 PM   #9
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Another thought: if this TV's going to be somewhat in the background and bearing in mind that a YouTube video isn't going to be created/viewed in high resolution, you might be able to do a passable job of constructing a fake TV and for the "screen", use a transparency backed up by some opal plex or diffusion gel (check a company called Rosco for stuff like this; theatrical/photo supply places will carry it) and backlit.

   
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