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Old 02-03-2017, 07:11 AM   #1
Steve Rindsberg
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Default Puh-ren-thu-see???

I was watching a video tutorial about programming. The presenter kept talking about left puhrenthuhsee and right puhrenthuhsee (doing my best to give a phonetic rendition of what he was saying).

I knew what he was talking about and had heard this: ( and this: ) referred to that way before. Puzzling.

Until I tumbled to it:

Say: PARENTHESES

Now, how do you form the singular? Since this is English and we make plurals by adding an S to most words, you form singular by lopping off the same S.

PARENTHESE

Parentheses w/o the S and pronounced that way.

I can rest easy.

   
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Old 02-03-2017, 11:33 AM   #2
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Ok...so...I went to dictionary.com and "parenthesis" is the singular form with the plural form, "parentheses"--fine distinction there for those of us who wear glasses and an even finer distinction on the listening end...'-}}


Speaking of words...I just recently learned that "vicar" and "vicarious" are related which seemes extraordinarily obvious now but, I only realized the connection while reading a book written in the 1930's by Charles Williams (an Inkling along with Tolkien, CS Lewis, et al). I felt really rather dumb...'-}}


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Old 02-03-2017, 03:14 PM   #3
Hugh Wyn Griffith
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I just checked in my old NSOED and it doesn't even list parentheses! Only the singular
parenthesis. Gives an example " a pair of parenthesis"

"In Parenthesis" is an epic poem written by David Jones, who served in the Royal Welch Fusiliers 38th Division along with my father during WW-I.

In case anyone is interested here's a BBC Blog that showed up when I Googled on [ royal welch fusiliers authors who served ]:

The Royal Welch Fusiliers: A literary regiment

Quite amazing! But of course the Welsh ....

   
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Old 02-04-2017, 07:05 AM   #4
Steve Rindsberg
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Vicar/Vicarious ... it makes sense once somebody thumps you over the head with it, no?

Emphasis/Emphases
Ellipsis/Ellipses (different pronunciation though, doesn't follow the pattern)
Hiccupsis/Hiccupses
Oop/Oopsies

   
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Old 02-04-2017, 08:47 AM   #5
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It's all Greek to me .....

   
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Old 02-04-2017, 10:36 AM   #6
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That's my thesis, too.

Or would that be thesee?

   
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Old 02-04-2017, 10:38 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Wyn Griffith View Post
I just checked in my old NSOED and it doesn't even list parentheses! Only the singular
parenthesis. Gives an example " a pair of parenthesis"

"In Parenthesis" is an epic poem written by David Jones, who served in the Royal Welch Fusiliers 38th Division along with my father during WW-I.

In case anyone is interested here's a BBC Blog that showed up when I Googled on [ royal welch fusiliers authors who served ]:

The Royal Welch Fusiliers: A literary regiment

Quite amazing! But of course the Welsh ....
Or the Welch. A nod to older spelling and the long history of the Fusiliers, according to the site; and thanks for the link.

   
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Old 02-04-2017, 12:56 PM   #8
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Quote:
hugh: In case anyone is interested here's a BBC Blog
Thanks for the link...very interesting...and I loved what I suspect is an unintended pun when discussing Captain JC Dunn "... His contribution to the war cannon was..."

'-}}


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Old 02-04-2017, 12:58 PM   #9
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Quote:
steve: it makes sense once somebody thumps you over the head with it, no?
Indeed...'-}}


I think it's because we don't tend to use the term "vicar" here in the States as often as they do in England so I just never made the connection...



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Old 02-04-2017, 03:17 PM   #10
Hugh Wyn Griffith
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My Welsh was a reference to the current people and usage.

Interesting NSOED etymology on Welsh:

Quote:
Also †Welch.
[Old English (Anglian, Kentish) W/lisa, W&lisa, (West Saxon) W)lisa, WLlisa corresp. to Old High German wal(a)hisc, walesc (German welsch) Roman, Italian, French, Dutch waalsch WALLOON, Old Norse Valskr Gaulish, French; from Old English W(e)alh corresp. to Old High German Wal(a)h, Old Norse Valir pl., from Germanic word meaning 'foreign (Celtic or Roman)' from Latin Volcae a Celtic people, of unkn. origin: see -ISH1. Cf. VLACH, WALACH.]

   
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