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Old 10-03-2010, 11:11 AM   #1
Ronald
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Default Reinstalling Software on New Computer/Laptop

My PC is dying; I can only run it in Safe Mode which prevents the use of the Internet or large software (thankfully, I have other outlets for the Internet). So I'm currently tossing all important files onto an external hard drive. Then my friend, an IT administrator, will wipe the PC's hard drive and I'll reinstall needed software and continue using it until I get myself a brand new laptop.

I have an opportunity to cheaply upgrade from CS2 to CS4. I'm wondering if my current PC would even be able to handle CS4 and how my old CS2 files will be read by the new version. Maybe I should just hurry up and get my new laptop.

While I'm at it, I guess I'll elaborate on that. I figured I should get a laptop instead of desktop because of my work in graphic design - being able to present my work and bring it with me would be convenient. I've always used PCs and will probably get Windows 7, but many graphic designers swear by Mac. I used Macs in school and didn't see a huge difference, but since I'm more accustomed to the former, I figure I'll stick with it.
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Old 10-03-2010, 11:50 AM   #2
Robin Springall
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You need a fairly wizzy computer to run CS4, but then the programs in the Adobe CS4 suite will read your CS2 files perfectly well. While you can't backsave InDesign files to CS2 and the InDesign Exchange thingy is pretty hit and miss (ie mainly miss) you can with Frus -- sorry, Illustrator -- and Photoshop files seem to be compatible with pretty much any version.

I'm also in the mood for a laptop, and wondering whether to get a mac or a PC. The PC will have to run Windows 7 32-bit (too many problems with 64-bit programs and device drivers) but I love the Macbook Pro screens. Mind you, no proper Delete key...

   
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Old 10-03-2010, 07:30 PM   #3
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Robin,

If you are really running Win 7 and Adobe apps, the 64-bit version is a really good idea. I have seen only a couple of driver issues, all with rather old hardware. The major advantage of 64-bit is the ability to handle more than 3.5 gb of RAM.
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Old 10-03-2010, 03:19 PM   #4
Hugh Wyn Griffith
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Personally I would hate to be entirely dependent on a laptop, with no desktop for routine at home work.

Firstly laptops are inherently more likely to breakdown than desktops partly because of being moved around a lot and hard drives don't like that and partly because so much is cramped into a small space that overheating is a real problem and even more so if you are going into heavy duty work.

Secondly, Laptops are for me ergonometrically unsound in design in most cases since the relative positions of screen and keyboard are wrong and I hate touchpads and not having the keyboard at the front of the horizontal surface. With few exceptions laptop keyboards are smaller and often come only with an embedded keypad.

OK you can plug in a keyboard and video monitor but getting the laptop screen out of the way is not always easy unless you can get a bridge to put the monitor on.

Oh yes, video chips in laptops are rarely as good performancewise as on a plug in video card in a desktop.

Use a desktop for daily work and use a laptop for what it is meant for: portability .....

   
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Old 10-03-2010, 06:09 PM   #5
Steve Rindsberg
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After confessing that my main computer is a laptop, can I still agree with everything Hugh says? I have several quirky reasons for working the way I do, so my preference wouldn't make sense for most people.

In addition to what Hugh mentions, desktops can last longer because you can upgrade the major components ... ram, HDD, graphics card etc, fairly easily.

And for the same spec, you'll probably pay more for the laptop. On the other hand, you could buy the desktop and with the money you save, pick up a cheap laptop or netbook that you could take on site to display your work; with properly prepared files, showing it won't take near the oomph that creating them will.

   
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Old 10-04-2010, 03:25 AM   #6
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Ooh, be careful of netbooks, Steve: until Intel bring out a dual-core Atom the processor is very under-powered. The thing about showing artwork to clients is they want you to make changes right there and then, and my little Samsung won't run any CS2 programs. (Mine? Ha! Daughter no 3 keeps on nicking it.)

The Macbook Pro seems to have a good processor, good graphics card, loads of RAM and disk space, and a well-proportioned screen. But -- crikey -- at a price that makes your eyes water. And no proper delete key. Mind you, the Dell Vostro 17" is fabulous for the price.

   
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Old 10-04-2010, 08:27 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Springall View Post
The thing about showing artwork to clients is they want you to make changes right there and then...
They always want you to do the work when they can peer over your shoulder and tell you what to do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Springall View Post
Mine? Ha! Daughter no 3 keeps on nicking it.
Sounds like a good reason to buy one that can be your own!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Springall View Post
The Macbook Pro seems to have a good processor, good graphics card, loads of RAM and disk space, and a well-proportioned screen. But -- crikey -- at a price that makes your eyes water. And no proper delete key. Mind you, the Dell Vostro 17" is fabulous for the price.
Sure made my eyes water!
HP might be an option if you remember to boot up before going in to your meeting as it takes half an eon to get going. They have some very nice ones, mine (a Pavillion dv5) isn't one of the more expensive but still good to work on. And you get a delete key too!

The one thing I do miss is a backlit keyboard, an optional extra on many laptops, but sadly not the dv5.

   
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Old 10-04-2010, 07:19 PM   #8
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Quote:
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They always want you to do the work when they can peer over your shoulder and tell you what to do.
That sounds like an excellent reason to have a cheap notebook that will be good for demos, but do the production work on the desktop. You can do a little touch up if needed, or get them to spec a color or roughly reposition things, but if they expect to sit and back seat drive while you redo the job, you can tell them that the machine is not powerful enough, and then go back to just getting specs from them, and doing the work at the office. As a designer, not a dtp hack for them.
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Old 10-05-2010, 11:49 AM   #9
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I like the way your mind works. Better yet, be an accommodating nice guy and be totally willing to do the work there and then. At your usual hourly rate. But mention that everything will take at least four times as long on the netbook as it would on the desktop back at the office.

   
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Old 10-05-2010, 12:20 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
I like the way your mind works. Better yet, be an accommodating nice guy and be totally willing to do the work there and then. At your usual hourly rate. But mention that everything will take at least four times as long on the netbook as it would on the desktop back at the office.
.... And will have to be cross-checked and verified on the office machine afterwards ......

   
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