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Old 07-24-2010, 04:29 PM   #1
Susie
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I may be the only person on the face of the planet that wants to ask this question, but here goes.

To access WiFi, do you have to be in a hotspot? I've been looking at the Barnes and Noble Nook (the B&N equivalent of the Kindle). There is a less expensive model that works via WiFi, while the more expensive model uses a 3-G network. If I was using the less expensive model, would I have to be near a hotspot in order to download books? Could I do the same from home?

   
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Old 07-24-2010, 07:02 PM   #2
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Yes, you do have to be in a hotspot. Mind you, if you have a wireless router at home, you have your own hotspot.

   
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Old 07-25-2010, 08:10 AM   #3
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Howard:
Quote:
if you have a wireless router at home
Or one of your neigbours has . . .

   
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Old 07-25-2010, 04:27 PM   #4
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I don't particularly wish to be dependent upon a neighbor, or hope that one has a wireless router. When I bite the bullet, I'll just go with either the more expensive Nook, or get the Kindle. I'm leaning toward the Kindle anyway.

   
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Old 07-25-2010, 04:30 PM   #5
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Depending on the price differences, it might pay to get a wireless router at home. If you don't have some sort of router already it would be a good idea anyway, because decent ones have basic firewall capacity, which is a good idea.
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Old 07-26-2010, 11:04 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Kayza View Post
Depending on the price differences, it might pay to get a wireless router at home. If you don't have some sort of router already it would be a good idea anyway, because decent ones have basic firewall capacity, which is a good idea.
Well, then, here's another dumb question - to use it, would I have to switch services, or the kind of service I use? I don't understand how that would work.

   
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:02 PM   #7
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Well, then, here's another dumb question - to use it, would I have to switch services, or the kind of service I use? I don't understand how that would work.
You shouldn't have to, no.

Basically, think of it as a splitter ... the cable or DSL signal comes into your house, you plug it into your PC. OR you plug it into the back of your router/wireless access point, which typically gives you four or so ethernet ports in the back, so now you can plug in three more computers if they're reasonably near by, PLUS it broadcasts a wireless signal that other computers can latch onto over the air.

   
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:05 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
Basically, think of it as a splitter ... the cable or DSL signal comes into your house, you plug it into your PC. OR you plug it into the back of your router/wireless access point, which typically gives you four or so ethernet ports in the back, so now you can plug in three more computers if they're reasonably near by, PLUS it broadcasts a wireless signal that other computers can latch onto over the air.
Now that I understand. Thanks for making it clear.

   
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Old 07-27-2010, 10:51 AM   #9
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When I got FiOS last December, I did take some time to set the wireless security and passwords--printing copies of everything--but I'd never had a chance to test it until a week or so ago when I was working on cleaning up a laptop one my sister's clients gave her and the ethernet connection wouldn't work--still not sure why.

Getting this laptop access to my wireless was more straightforward than I expected--all it took was to name the wireless profile on the laptop and enter my wireless password--so I expected it to be as straightforward when I took the laptop over to my sister's place (she is renting a condo in the building next door to mine).

My sister has Comcast cable and I just couldn't get a consistent connect to her wireless. I am very anal about keeping notes on things and my sister doesn't share that trait but she did have all the paperwork from Comcast about her router and cable modem and told me that the wireless key she used on her regular laptop (her primary system) was the one shown on most recent worksheet from Comcast. The problem was that it wasn't working so I'm shuffling around the papers she has and I came across a sheet of a .txt file printout with a wireless key. Having nothing to lose, I tried that and BINGO! the new laptop connected solidly to her wireless.

After couple of hours installing some software and showing her stuff, I wanted to check her router settings but I couldn't get to the router's admin pages so I figured maybe the process was different from the way I was used to doing it with Verizon's equipment and I'd do some research for her so I needed to get the specs on her router and cable box.

That's when I discovered why we'd had such a problem getting a solid connect to her wireless...

I'd been entering the router's serial number as the wireless key...'-}}

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Old 07-27-2010, 11:23 AM   #10
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BTW: there are several sites out there that list the default IP address/admin names/passwords for huge numbers of wireless routers/access points. Handy to remember. Handier still to have a copy saved to your laptop or printed out (nothing more frustrating than knowing that the info you need is just on the other side of the access point you can't connect to because you don't have the info you need).

Google e.g.
default wireless router password
wireless router password list
to get useful hits.

   
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