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Old 12-06-2008, 07:34 AM   #1
Peter Katin
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Default Word envelopes

I don't know where this belongs. I've been driven mad by the fact that all versions of Word restrict the number of lines on an envelope to seven (using a DL envelope and 12pt font). I'm using 2002 but I've been told that 2003 isn't any better. Is there a cure for this?

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Old 12-06-2008, 08:14 AM   #2
Steve Rindsberg
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It looks as though you can put as much as you like on an envelope if you create a document and set its page size to, say, #10 envelope.

Or if you're using its labels & envelopes function, choose Options in the Envelopes & Labels dialog box then choose a smaller font for the delivery address. I'm looking at a 10-line "address" right now and it looks as though it'd allow me even more lines.

   
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Old 12-06-2008, 08:38 AM   #3
Peter Katin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
It looks as though you can put as much as you like on an envelope if you create a document and set its page size to, say, #10 envelope.

Or if you're using its labels & envelopes function, choose Options in the Envelopes & Labels dialog box then choose a smaller font for the delivery address. I'm looking at a 10-line "address" right now and it looks as though it'd allow me even more lines.
I've not heard of the first option, but I'm using the labels & envelopes function. I know that choosing a smaller font will give me more lines but I always prefer to ensure that the address can be easily read! I still can't figure out why there's a limitation anyway.
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Old 12-06-2008, 10:56 AM   #4
Michael Rowley
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Peter:

Quote:
I still can't figure out why there's a limitation anyway
I don't know if the practical limit for a DL envelope is seven lines of 12-point set solid (they would have a total depth of only about 7/6 in, I believe), but there is a limit to the depth allowed by the International Postal Union, since the width of the area above the address is limited and so is the width of the area below.

   
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Old 12-06-2008, 11:14 AM   #5
Peter Katin
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Sorry, I've got the thread a bit mixed up. But I don't know of an International Postal Union in the UK. Still, I did manage to produce an envelope according to what you advised although it does take time to set it up as it has to be separate from the letter itself (I think). The other things about it are (a) it's difficult to position the address, and (b) as the return address has to be included that takes a certain amount of juggling. Should I produce a permanent envelope with the return address on it, then return to it when I have to use an envelope with a long address?
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Old 12-06-2008, 11:51 AM   #6
Michael Rowley
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Peter:

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I did manage to produce an envelope according to what you advised
That was Steve! But I did give you the duff advice about the 'Internatioal Postal Union' (it should have been the Universal Postal Union), and I find that I was wrong about DL envelopes in general; but there are limits to the sizes of windows in window-envelopes, set nationally. This gives the size of windows in DL envelopes in the UK:

'United Kingdom: BS 4264 specifies that the transparent window on a DL envelope should be 93 × 39 mm large. Its top-left corner should be located 20 mm from the left margin and 53 mm from the top margin of the envelope. BS 1808 specifies an 80 × 30 mm large address panel on the letterhead. Its top-left corner is located 20 mm from the left margin and 51 mm from the top margin of the page. The address panel is embedded inside a 91 × 48 mm large exclusion zone whose top left corner is located 20 mm from the left margin and 42 mm from the top margin of the page. In other words, the area 9 mm above and below and 11 mm right of the address panel should be kept clean of any other printing.'

I use DL window envelopes, and there is space for one's return address and about six lines of address 10/12 pt. If you use a template there's not much trouble about placing the address in the right place, and you don't need to address envelopes. Tip: if your letter is to a UK address, the county is not needed, provided you have the post town; that saves a line!

   
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Old 12-06-2008, 01:40 PM   #7
Peter Katin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley View Post
Peter:

That was Steve! But I did give you the duff advice about the 'Internatioal Postal Union' (it should have been the Universal Postal Union), and I find that I was wrong about DL envelopes in general; but there are limits to the sizes of windows in window-envelopes, set nationally. This gives the size of windows in DL envelopes in the UK:

'United Kingdom: BS 4264 specifies that the transparent window on a DL envelope should be 93 × 39 mm large. Its top-left corner should be located 20 mm from the left margin and 53 mm from the top margin of the envelope. BS 1808 specifies an 80 × 30 mm large address panel on the letterhead. Its top-left corner is located 20 mm from the left margin and 51 mm from the top margin of the page. The address panel is embedded inside a 91 × 48 mm large exclusion zone whose top left corner is located 20 mm from the left margin and 42 mm from the top margin of the page. In other words, the area 9 mm above and below and 11 mm right of the address panel should be kept clean of any other printing.'

I use DL window envelopes, and there is space for one's return address and about six lines of address 10/12 pt. If you use a template there's not much trouble about placing the address in the right place, and you don't need to address envelopes. Tip: if your letter is to a UK address, the county is not needed, provided you have the post town; that saves a line!
Michael - Well, I don't use window envelopes. I have to work out where the address goes, and maybe I've got it wrong but I find it a nuisance to gauge where the address should go. Also I'm not happy about security - a few days ago I received a window envelope which contained a replacement credit card. It could have been easily cut open (as some are). You say "If you use a template there's not much trouble about placing the address in the right place, and you don't need to address envelopes." How do I do this? My memory goes back to the stone ages when I had a dot matrix printer!


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Old 12-06-2008, 03:14 PM   #8
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Peter:

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How do I do this? My memory goes back to the stone ages when I had a dot matrix printer!
Well, I hope that you're not still using a matrix printer; but you'd probably have been deafened by now if you are.

If you are using Word 2002, you'd probably best make an empty table with the number and size to fit a window in the envelopes you use—I gather that that's DL envelopes, but within the UK you could use C5 envelopes. You need to be clear about how you will fold the A4 sheet: once horizontally for C5, twice horizontally for DL. If you use DL envelopes, you will need fold marks on both the sides of the A4 sheet in two positions.

Position the table correctly to suit the window position, which if it's a BS envelope will have the dimensions I gave you. The URL

http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-paper.html

gives all the standard paper and envelope dimensions.

Complete the template by adding anything that won't change, e.g. Peter Katin, then save it as a template (i.e. with a DOT filename extension. e.g. letter.dot). To use it, choose that template when typing letters.

   
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Old 12-06-2008, 01:51 PM   #9
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I suspect you could simplify positioning by filling the entire envelope-sized page with a table.

Top row, a dummy to give you the top margin you need
Left column, the same
Row two, column two, your return address starts

and so on

   
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Old 12-06-2008, 02:27 PM   #10
Peter Katin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
I suspect you could simplify positioning by filling the entire envelope-sized page with a table.

Top row, a dummy to give you the top margin you need
Left column, the same
Row two, column two, your return address starts

and so on
mmm... Well, I'll give it a try. The real annoyance isn't that often - recently I had to write to Packard Bell and the address had ten lines and no way of condensing it because of the number of lines containing apparently PO box numbers!


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