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Old 03-31-2008, 07:47 AM   #1
LoisWakeman
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Default An image-related tip that might be useful

I've just done a minor redesign for one of my clients who said he wanted a fawn rather than green background for his site (and when i asked him to quantify fawn, came up with a pale blue!).

Doing the text and backgrounds took about 5 minutes as of course I use CSS, but the logos were more problematic, as I hadn't followed my own advice to save a layered file (e.g. PSP or PSD), so I had to recreate them from scratch instead of just changing the background colour.

Of course, I'd forgotten long ago what fonts I used and couldn't tell what I used from the raster version. I recognised Palatino and Wingdings 2, and eventually used the http://www.identifont.com/ site to track down Zapf Chancery from just three letters (T, h, e) - very impressive!

So, my tip is: use a layered file with separate text and backgrounds - and put a note in the image information about what fonts you used.

(Unfortunately, I no longer have ZC installed on XP, and can't remember where I got it from on Windows 2000 when I originally made the site. Unwilling to buy it for such a quick job when I know I must have a legitimate copy somewhere on a CD, I used a font sample display site to copy the bitmap alphabet and fiddled with the size, hue and contrast to get an acceptable match for my new background. But that was 20 mins wasted for what should've taken 2. You can see the joins if you look hard enough - the anti-aliasing of "The" isn't quite the right colour - but it's good enough for web use. So, tip 2 is : Save a copy of less usual font files with the web resources.)
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Old 03-31-2008, 10:20 AM   #2
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Layered PSDs, yay! - I do wish more clients would remember that. Also layered tiffs for use with Quark.

   
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Old 03-31-2008, 12:56 PM   #3
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Or layered PSPs, of course

   
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Old 03-31-2008, 01:25 PM   #4
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robin: Also layered tiffs for use with Quark.
I've never saved a layered TIF--I always flatten and delete any masks. Have you ever run into a problem when working with layered TIFs?

The only time I use TIF files (vs. a layered and/or flattened PSD) is if I'm going to give the file to someone who doesn't have/use imaging software or if I will be using the file in WordPerfect because TIFs (flattened) are pretty much placeable in most wp programs.

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Old 04-01-2008, 07:56 AM   #5
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Layered tiffs are excellent for placing complicated artwork in Quark: saves having to make a separated flattened tiff of your PSD changes. Not very good for other things, though, as many pitcure viewers won't open them, but great for Quark.

   
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Old 04-02-2008, 03:40 PM   #6
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robin:Layered tiffs are excellent for placing complicated artwork in Quark: saves having to make a separated flattened tiff of your PSD changes. Not very good for other things, though
Ahhh...ok...I figured that might be the case and since I don't work in Quark, I'll keep flattening...'-}}

Thanks!

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Old 03-31-2008, 03:47 PM   #7
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Wouldn't a vector graphic be a better choice for this sort of logo? Then you wouldn't need to worry about the fonts years after the fact, you could scale it to any size you want and rasterize it at whatever size is convenient for inserting into your raster art. And changing the colour of part of the logo--to match the "fawn" (a blue baby deer? Give it some air!) for example--would be simple, too.

   
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Old 03-31-2008, 11:33 PM   #8
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Wouldn't a vector graphic be a better choice for this sort of logo?
Better than what? As far as I know both PSDs and PSPs (I do know this) can be vector graphics.

   
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Old 04-01-2008, 12:34 AM   #9
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It is a vector graphic - I'd just forgotten to save the original file, and only had the flattened GIF version.
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Old 04-01-2008, 06:49 AM   #10
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Nice save!

When I create logos and other complex artwork, I always retain the original at in its most flexible state. Then I save out “print” versions for a particular job in appropriate size, resolution, and file format.

It’s not that I’m so smart — it was necessary to work this way in the early days of DTP. Our requirements far outstripped our technical capacity!

In the early 1980s, most of my clients (and some suppliers) were on dialup if they were on-line at all. Until Syquest removeables appeared, compressed archives on floppies were the norm (and large files often had to be segmented to fit on several floppies, then reconstituted at the other end).

Anyway, I still keep the original artwork in manipulable form. Reading your message, I see why I should continue!

I like your idea of making a note of the fonts used, but be sure to include the maker’s name and creation date of the font, if you know it. There have been so many remakes of fonts over the years that you might get in trouble with the name alone.

   
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