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Old 03-22-2008, 06:18 PM   #1
ktinkel
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Default English accents

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Originally Posted by Britannia View Post
Yes, thinking of it I suppose there'd be no harm in trying. I mean it's probably the best thing to do instead of using 12 year old software - I don't even use half the functions on it anymore anyway. Again, thanks for recommending it, I'll probably have a look at the trial after the Easter bank holiday (the whole country's off work for the next two days due to it being a national holiday).

Oh, and with the accent, I don't really type with it, but ah 'spose if wey'd be talkin' laa'k we do 'round 'ere, then wey'd probly be speakin' summit laa'k this realli' - afta a nice bit o' stew pot fer yer brekkie, washed dahn witha pot a tea.

Thanks all...
Ah! I had a friend from England who sounded like that!

Now how do you do with Brooklynese (not that I speak it, you understand!)?

Thank god for accents. English is a great language.

   
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Old 03-23-2008, 09:34 AM   #2
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KT:

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I had a friend from England who sounded like that
Well, it didn’t hurt Lord Tennyson, who had, as everyone can still hear, a broad Lincolnshire accent.

   
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Old 03-23-2008, 11:48 PM   #3
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I was once in a conference where one of the "suits" of a company stepped up on the podium - suit and all - to give a talk to a big audience and as soon as he opened his mouth there was a (shocked?) absolute silence in the room: what came out was English with a very "broad" Cockney accent. He could have stepped straight out of "Eastenders", and his accent was stronger than that of most characters in that series.

I still wonder whether he may not have used that on purpose, it was quite effective in getting the attention of the audience.

   
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Old 03-24-2008, 09:06 AM   #4
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Marjolein:

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what came out was English with a very "broad" Cockney accent
Unless you say what the conference was about (though I doubt it was about linguistics), or where it was, there's nothing remarkable about that; nor, for that matter, is there anything remarkable about a suit—for a man.

   
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Old 03-24-2008, 10:26 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by ktinkel View Post
Ah! I had a friend from England who sounded like that!

Now how do you do with Brooklynese (not that I speak it, you understand!)?

Thank god for accents. English is a great language.
Youbetcha, and I sure wouldn't mind a cawfee with my boid tonight! Although that was a poor imitation, I think I know what you mean - that's the first accent I hear in my head when talking about America. Second to that lovely, Southern, country one. Love Dolly Parton's accent (I hope I'm not on me own either).

Unfortunately, the arrogant Southerners in this country (notably cockneys) despise us Northerners - I get given horrid looks and upturned noses if I'm in Kent or London.
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Old 03-25-2008, 03:25 AM   #6
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I'm surprised at that - London is cosmopolitan these days, so you are unlikely (IME) to be looked down on for an accent, from whatever part of the country or world.

Such discrimination seems rather unusual to me. My husband is a Mancunian, and I don't ever remember him being looked down upon when we lived in Berkshire. Nor was I scoffed at when we visited his home city.
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Old 04-07-2008, 03:33 AM   #7
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I'm surprised at that - London is cosmopolitan these days, so you are unlikely (IME) to be looked down on for an accent, from whatever part of the country or world.
Unless you speak with an "RP" accent. A TV producer recently told me that someone's voice was "too middle-class for TV".

There is some chap who campaigns for English spellings to be standardised and simplified. I asked him whether "grass" should, under his system, be spelt "grars" or "gras"....
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Old 04-07-2008, 07:47 AM   #8
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Ben:

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There is some chap who campaigns for English spellings to be standardised and simplified. I asked him whether "grass" should, under his system, be spelt "grars" or "gras"...
Not a fair question . . . or a very acute one: English as spoken in England has no uniform pronunciation of grass, mass, Bass (the beer brewer), etc.

   
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Old 04-07-2008, 08:55 AM   #9
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I am aware that English has no uniform pronunciation.
But his point was that English should be given a phonetically standardised spelling, like Italian. So that implies a standard accent, or varied spelling.
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Old 04-07-2008, 10:23 AM   #10
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Ben:

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I am aware that English has no uniform pronunciation.
But his point was that English should be given a phonetically standardised spelling, like Italian. So that implies a standard accent, or varied spelling.
I understand his point, but Italian, and to a lesser extent, German, is largely a synthetic language. An English tenor singing in Italian at the Fenice can be understood by Venetians, but not a lot of them speak Italian.

   
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