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Old 03-02-2008, 05:18 AM   #1
dogmandouglas
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Default Switching off "intelli-justification" in Indesign

We recently had a job sent into our works in Indesign. The customer had supplied a print-ready pdf for us to work with and the Indesign doc was a back-up.

Just before going to press the customer submitted a few corrections to be done. We open up Indesign and did the corrections.

But on one page where we had to change "is" to "it" Indesign altered the page endings, running text around to form different paras. If we altered the text back to way it was ie changing the "it" back to "is" the text reformatted back to the original.

We could understand text reflowing after the altered para due to insertion or deletion of text but not text above and in a different para altogether where there was no change.

This is of course Indesign's "intelli-text" balancing up the paras nicely but as we have to print the job exactly as it is submitted we had to go through the paras putting in soft returns to return the job to how it was submitted.

Does anyone know how to turn off this feature?

This feature is quite annoying, if I was a designer, I would not like the DTP program to decide how it was going to display the text.

Anyone agree?
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Old 03-02-2008, 05:40 AM   #2
ktinkel
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Select the paragraph, open the paragraph palette (if not already open), click on the Show Options indicator at the right (a little arrow), and change the first pair of options (from Adobe Paragraph Composer to Adobe Single Line Composer). That may fix it.

You could also look at the paragraph (i.e., word spacing) options, as they affect the way either composition system works.

Every page layout program includes some built-in assumptions about hyphenation and justification — it has to. This is what page layout programs do: set type.

The details can be changed by the user, but I can tell you from long experience with DTP applications that many, perhaps most users — most except typographers or type-oriented designers — leave the settings at the default. I don’t remember what the default settings were for InDesign (I have had the program on my system continually since early alpha versions), but I believe it is to have Paragraph Composer turned on.

It is — or can be — very useful. It does not have to be Big Brother typesetting; it is a tool for the user.

   
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Old 03-03-2008, 08:38 AM   #3
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The point I was trying to make was once the page has been set, and you're happy with it, but you have to do a correction to a small part of the page it is a bit odd that other parts of the page could change when you haven't touched them.

It does mean however that we now have to check all the page when we do a correction just in case something has reflowed. Because if the page is not what the customer has submitted you can bet that they will be looking for a reduction in price quoted.

That's life!
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Old 03-03-2008, 11:25 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dogmandouglas View Post
The point I was trying to make was once the page has been set, and you're happy with it, but you have to do a correction to a small part of the page it is a bit odd that other parts of the page could change when you haven't touched them.

It does mean however that we now have to check all the page when we do a correction just in case something has reflowed. Because if the page is not what the customer has submitted you can bet that they will be looking for a reduction in price quoted.

That's life!
Should have edited a PDF, I guess. Seems to be the way of things.

I guess it would seem unreasonable to ask the client to make the correction and send a new file. On the other hand, if they insist on asking for changes and then accept no side-effect changes to the layout, perhaps they should not ask you to make the change in the first place.

In my shoes, if I were the designer on the job, I would make the change and send a new file. I would have the most to lose, sitting between the client and the printer.

   
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Old 03-03-2008, 11:40 PM   #5
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Normally InDesign will only reformat the paragraph that's being changed. That can, of course, have all sorts of knock-on effects, particularly if using orfan/widow control.

If earlier paragraphs are being reformatted then it suggests that there's a difference in font metrics between those on the original machine and yours.

I've noticed that sometimes reformatting in InDesign is sometimes a bit 'elastic'. Insert a character and a paragraph will reformat. Delete that same character and the paragraph will not return to its original state. Something like that could be going on if your document only reformats after an edit.

   
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Old 03-04-2008, 08:19 AM   #6
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I guess I'm just fussy, this must just be a hangover from my letterpress days – where I put a character it stayed put and didn't move about. In those days we wished for rubber type – I guess we now have it.

Just another weird thing about Indesign – I corrected a job last night where the designer had put in an extra line return at the end of a para which was the last para in the column, this caused the last line in the para to have different line spacing from the other lines in the para. The cure was to delete the last return and the paragraph spacing adjusted itself properly.

Of course we never see what settings the customers are using, but we never change anything if we can help it.

We had a job sent in to us in Quark, where the customer had placed 100 blank pages in front of one section to get the automatic page numbers to work properly for him. He obviously had never heard of Section marks.

Another customer had placed all the text in separate boxes each with a different colour background to get a cross hatch pattern across the page. We could think of several different ways to get the same effect without all that work. Still it was his time.

Am I ranting, I expect so – but some designers just want to make you scream.

The answer of course is let all these problems fly over your head, and just get on with it . . . but sometimes . . .

Doug
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Old 03-04-2008, 08:38 AM   #7
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For every designer who actually learns (most of) the favored layout program there are 10 or 20 who do not — they just wing it.

And for every output jockey who understands the designer software whose files they receive, there are 10 or 20 who do not — they just shove it down the network and hope for the best.

I believe it is the way of the world. Fortunately, enough stuff works well enough so everyone gets by, or someone else fixes it.

What can you do? As you said: “The answer of course is let all these problems fly over your head, and just get on with it . . . ”

   
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