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Old 01-21-2008, 12:09 PM   #1
Michael Rowley
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Default I've got a problem!

My problem is this: just before Christmas my one and only computer with Windows XP stopped recognizing both the keyboard & mouse once it started Windows, which otherwise was working normally (but it really shouldn't have announced it had found a 86-key keyboard!). All rescue attempts failed.

I've got a new computer ordered, so it has been suggested that I mount the old hard disk in it as an extra disk. In that way I could save the registered programs and my data. But I've never done this; is there anything I must observe?

   
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Old 01-21-2008, 12:32 PM   #2
Steve Rindsberg
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Installing the old hdd as a second drive will preserve your data but not your registered programs. You'll need to reinstall them again to the new OS, or install the old HDD as the primary disk and boot to it (hoping that the other hardware changes don't make XP decide you're a criminal ... but even if it does, you can probably do a phone-in reactivation to MS, explain what you've done and they should reactivate XP for you w/o further ado).

But you're getting Vista on the new PC, aren't you? Setting up the old drive as main and booting into XP may not be what you want to do. If you want to stick with Vista, you'll probably need to reinstall most of your software, but adding the old drive will still give you access to your data.

Alternative: buy an external USB or firewire case, install the old drive into that. That'll give you your old data without having to mess around inside the new PC. And you'll no doubt find other uses for the external drive later (backup, taking projects to another PC, etc.)

   
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Old 01-21-2008, 01:29 PM   #3
Michael Rowley
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Steve:

Quote:
Installing the old hdd as a second drive will preserve your data but not your registered programs.
Oh! The programs is what I want to save, as in addition the programs for which I have the CDs, I have quite bit invested in programs that were downloaded, and, above all, fonts.

I had intended to put back the old hard disk afterwards and reinstal Windows XP, because the computer, though old, functions adequately if it's not given too much to do.

Quote:
buy an external USB or firewire case, install the old drive into that
Err . . . what's a 'USB case'?

   
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Old 01-21-2008, 04:59 PM   #4
terrie
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michael: Err . . . what's a 'USB case'?
A harddrive case--basically what you would do it to buy the case (here in the States they run anywhere from about $25 to $90-ish depending on the types of connectors--usb, firewire, sata) and put your drive in the case and then plug the case cable into the appropriate port and you'll have access to your files.

I think that's the best way to go--it's easier I think that trying to install the drive on your new system.

I'm planning on buying 2 external hard drive cases myself for my 120gb drive and my 40gb drive from my old system. I'll give the 40gb drive case to my sister so she can use it for external storage...

From the quick look I took at the newegg.com site, I'll probably go with a simple USB2 enclosure as they are the least expensive--I do want one that has an on/off switch...

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Old 01-22-2008, 08:51 AM   #5
Michael Rowley
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Terrie:

Quote:
I think that's the best way to go--it's easier I think that trying to install the drive on your new system
Thanks: I'll follow your advice. A case for the old hard disk doesn't sound dear, especially when the cost is reckoned in sterling!

   
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Old 01-22-2008, 09:54 AM   #6
terrie
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michael: Thanks: I'll follow your advice. A case for the old hard disk doesn't sound dear, especially when the cost is reckoned in sterling!
I do think that it will make your life easier...

As to getting your software on the new system...

What I did was to gather all of my software CDs and I installed the software on the new system from the original CDs one at a time and for each I then installed any patches that were available--I had 99% of the patches saved in my master download folder (with subfolders for each piece of software).

Then, for most software, I just copied the software installation from my old system to the new system "clean" software installation. I also copied the Doc/Settings & Application Data info for each program from the old system to the new system--I did make a copy of the new installation files before doing the overlay copy in case I ran into problems--I did on some...see below.

Note that where possible, I've always installed my software on a separate "software" hard drive partition rather than in the "standard" C:\Program Files area and I partitioned the drives on my new system so that I had an "H:\" drive (my "software" drive) on the new system and installed the software using the same filename (for example: Photoshop7 is "PS7") so that everything would "match".

One area where I ran into well...not a difficulty but an oddity...with the overlaying of the old system software files onto the new system "clean" install files was in the area of how the software is displayed on the screen.

Remember that I moved from a 19" CRT monitor with a screen res of 1152x875 (something close to that) to a 20" LCD monitor with a res of 1600x1200.

What I found in both Painter and Photoshop after I did the overlay was that some of the palettes displayed in the same position they were on the 19" monitor rather than where they should display on the 20" monitor--I had started the "clean install" software at least once to make sure that the install worked so I knew there was a discrepancy in the display and I resolved this by having to uninstall and then reinstall the software on the new system and then carefully overlay just some of the Doc/Settings/Application Data files from the old system...

Sooo...after all of the above advice, what I would do--knowing what I know now--is to

1. Make sure to make a copy of the Doc/Settings/Application Data files for the "clean install" before overlaying any of them with the old system's files.

2. Before overlaying the new system software files, take a quick look and compare them to the old system software files as you may find that all of the user differences are in Doc/Settings/Application Data--with the exception of my Photoshop and Painter brushes, I didn't need to overlay the majority of the software files...

Hope that helps...

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Old 01-22-2008, 01:24 PM   #7
Michael Rowley
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Terrie:

Quote:
Hope that helps
I will indeed!

I have never partitioned a disk: the biggest I've had so far is 20 000 Mbit, and the one before was only 500 Mbit.

   
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Old 01-22-2008, 03:43 PM   #8
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michael: I have never partitioned a disk: the biggest I've had so far is 20 000 Mbit, and the one before was only 500 Mbit.
Ahhh...I kept thinking I'd left a piece out and that was it...

I used Partition Magic 8 which is well worth the money even if you only use it once because it's just so easy to use and makes life ever so much simpler...

My new system has one 80gb drive and two 500gb drives partitioned and used as follows:

1. 80gb drive:
- C:\ 40gb used as my boot drive
- E:\ 5gb Pagefile
- G:\ 35gb used for text data (vs. my images)


2. 500gb drive #1:
- D:\ 10gb used for Photoshop Scratch file
- H:\ 45gb all my software (that installers will allow to be installed where I want it rather than C:\Program Files (ugh!)
- I:\ 45gb my downloads, Eudora and odds and ends of other stuff
- J:\ 400gb all my image files

3. 500gb drive #2:
- K 500gb nothing there yet

As I mentioned above I used Partition Magic 8 to do the partitioning and then after partitioning, I went into Control Panel > Admin Tools > Computer Management > Storage > Disk Management to change the drive letters on all the drives except C:\ to conform to my old system which had Photoshop Scratch on D:\, my text data files on G:\, my software programs on H:\, my download directory, Eudora files and my website on I:\ and my image files on J:\.

I later created a Pagefile on the 80gb drive by taking just a bit from the Text Data (G:\) partition using Partition Magic 8 and defined the
Pagefile as follows:

Control Panel > System > Advanced > Performance > Settings > Advanced > Virtual Memory > Change:

- Highlight C:\ and choose "no page file"

- Highlight E:\ and set min and max = 4900 and click on SET

- OK out...

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Old 01-21-2008, 06:22 PM   #9
Steve Rindsberg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley View Post
Steve:



Oh! The programs is what I want to save, as in addition the programs for which I have the CDs, I have quite bit invested in programs that were downloaded, and, above all, fonts.

I had intended to put back the old hard disk afterwards and reinstal Windows XP, because the computer, though old, functions adequately if it's not given too much to do.



Err . . . what's a 'USB case'?
I may've jumped to a conclusion; do you mean you want to save the installation programs for the software you've downloaded? If so, that'll be no problem, whether you install the old HDD in the new case or in an external case.

I was thinking you meant e.g. the installed copies of Office and the like. Those you'll need to reinstall from the CD.

   
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Old 01-22-2008, 08:46 AM   #10
Michael Rowley
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Steve:

Quote:
I was thinking you meant e.g. the installed copies of Office and the like. Those you'll need to reinstall from the CD.
I'm actually concerned about my Adobe programs (Acrobat 8, InDesign CS2), which are all upgrades. I wanted to put them on the new computer anyway, but until a month ago I had assumed I would be transferring them from a working computer, i.e. one that still remembers my keyboard and mouse. I didn't know then that my computer could go ga-ga before I did.

   
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