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Old 08-29-2006, 01:35 PM   #1
Michael Rowley
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Default How do you make accents?

How do you make accented letters, dashes, etc. in Windows using a popular browser? I can't do it with FireFox !.5, though I used to be able to with Internet Explorer 6. Now I'm using IE 7 (beta), and I can do it again only for certain codes (if I type Alt+02–, some numbers just bring down the Favourites list!).

   
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Old 08-29-2006, 04:21 PM   #2
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The 'hard' way - use the "Character Map" accessory

I used to know a method like control-shift-colon before e to get e-umlaut, but that may have been a Word specialty and/or may require a different keyboard setting.

(Later...)

After changing the (Win2K) keyboard to US-International, I can use Ctrl-Alt-q to generate a-umlaut. (I'd show you but I am logged in under Linux)

Last edited by gary; 08-29-2006 at 05:03 PM.
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Old 08-30-2006, 07:53 AM   #3
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Gary:

That, I think, is an MS Office shortcut, and one of the few that work (in Word), because I use a UK keyboard. In Windows I can get the extended ASCII characters by typing Alt+0---, where the hyphens denote decimal three-digit numbers, and in Word I can enter the hexadecimal number followed by the Alt+x. But in FireFox trying to use the ASCII number loses me the 'Reply' window, and in IE 7 beta I also get unexpected results with some numbers, particularly Alt+0233, which is the e with an acute accent.

   
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Old 08-29-2006, 05:45 PM   #4
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For the simple ones I just switch to the Dutch keyboard so I can type things like " followed by u to get ü; for more unusual ones (or ones that I don't know the "chords" for) I use the character map (example: ŏ - small letter o with breve).

(I actually use the latter method a lot for entering geographical names for my Travel Blog: the Latin transliterations quite often still require Unicode characters. And I'll soon - well after I came back - be adding alternative names in other scripts as well so I can add local names and have the pages "findable" with those names.)

   
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Old 08-30-2006, 08:06 AM   #5
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Marjolein:

Quote:
I just switch to the Dutch keyboard
I'm using a UK keyboard, which has the same letters as a US keyboard but has many different positions for some of the other signs.

Why don't you use Unicode numbers direct, in Word 2000 by using a macro (if entering the Unicode hex number followed by Alt+x doesn't work)? I don't know anything about b-logs, but I should have thought typing them in Word and pasting was the simplest way of getting any Unicode character.

   
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Old 08-30-2006, 09:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley View Post
I'm using a UK keyboard, which has the same letters as a US keyboard but has many different positions for some of the other signs.
The point is not where the keys are but which keyboard input locale you use. The Dutch one has these "dead" keys that make the combinations for accented characters and stuff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
Why don't you use Unicode numbers direct, in Word 2000 by using a macro (if entering the Unicode hex number followed by Alt+x doesn't work)? I don't know anything about b-logs, but I should have thought typing them in Word and pasting was the simplest way of getting any Unicode character.
Because I rarely, if ever, use Word - and it's not commonly available in Internet cafes. I do use HTML forms though, so I just either type an entity ref (which is using a Unicode number directly - only decimal) or I copy-and-paste from the Character Map.

(Forget what you know about blogs - I use my own software specially made for a travel blog.)

Besides, I have no idea what happens when you copy and paste from Word into a web form textarea - not much good, I imagine. When traveling, I use webmail to update the site (no direct edit for security reasons) and I actually tend to compose my text in Notepad (or Wordpad - but even that is a bother) and then copy and paste into my webmail composing form. At home I have my update application which is a little easier to use, but for entering Unicode stuff the same applies: copy and paste or enter an entity - either ends up as the same thing in the database anyway.

(A few of those entities I know by heart, and with my little list I soon know more when on the road. The one yuan/yen is easy to remember: it's 1200 - but this forum's software botches those while my travel blog software treats them intelligently (Ұ) Oooh, look: I actually see a yuan sign now!)

   
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Old 08-30-2006, 02:09 PM   #7
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Marjolein:

Quote:
The point is not where the keys are but which keyboard input locale you use
I don't know what an 'input locale' is, but I remember now that as long as the key pressed is the appropriate one, the same signal goes to the computer.

Quote:
Forget what you know about blogs
I can't do that, because (as I said) I know nothing about blogs.

Quote:
what happens when you copy and paste from Word into a web form text area
I think the text is pasted, that's all, but you can format it as plain text if you're superstitious.

Quote:
The one yuan/yen is easy to remember: it's 1200
If that's meant to be the yen sign, what's '1200' to do with it? It's 00A5 in hex, or 165 decimal.

   
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Old 08-31-2006, 12:51 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley View Post
I don't know what an 'input locale' is, but I remember now that as long as the key pressed is the appropriate one, the same signal goes to the computer.
Which is where the "input locale" comes into play, combnining some keystrokes into single glyphs.

In Chinese internet cafes, they often have a bunch of them installed: the keyboard itself is a normal US-international keyboard but depending on what input locale you choose (Chinese, English, Korean, sometimes more) it behaves quite differently. Chinese is interesting - it's a "combining" one like Dutch but you also get little dropdown menus for characters; but just typing English (not using the dropdowns) with that you'll actually end up with mostly Chinese characters because the software combines the keystrokes into other characters. So I need the English keyboard (yes I know the official name is "input locale" but everyone says "keyboard" and that's what I'll need to use to ask for in an Internet cafe or they won't understand me!).

When you install Windows, it wants to know both what physical keyboard you have, and what input locales (one or more) you're going to use with that.

Quote:
If that's meant to be the yen sign, what's '1200' to do with it? It's 00A5 in hex, or 165 decimal.
It's what I've seen used on Chinese pages - so that's what I'm using. Besides it's easy to remember. But I don't need to remember the ones for the nice "typographical" quotes since my software takes care of that automatically, as well as a few others like m-dashes and ellipsis.

Which reminds me of another little trick: copy and paste from a web page and then check what (Unicode) numerical code I end up with. (And I must look up some of the other characters I'll be using before I leave...)

   
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Old 08-31-2006, 07:06 AM   #9
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Marjolein:

Quote:
In Chinese internet cafes, they often have a bunch of them installed: the keyboard itself is a normal US-international keyboard but depending on what input locale you choose (Chinese, English, Korean, sometimes more) it behaves quite differently.
Ah, you're talking about CJK computers. There are various ways of combining Chinese and other characters in Unicode, but I suppose that software that takes advantage of them hasn't filtered down to Internet cafes.

As you can see ('cafes'), I still haven't found a way of getting an e with an acute accent. The alternative way of getting that, Ctrl+e, works in MS Word but not on this message board, and Alt+0233 (which is the one I remember mostly) loses the 'Quick Reply' in FireFox.

   
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Old 08-31-2006, 03:36 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley View Post
Ah, you're talking about CJK computers.
That, too - but my computer isn't! I just brought that up as an extra illustration how it's the software that combines the keystrokes - just like my Dutch input locale does to produce accented characters and such.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
As you can see ('cafes'), I still haven't found a way of getting an e with an acute accent. The alternative way of getting that, Ctrl+e, works in MS Word but not on this message board, and Alt+0233 (which is the one I remember mostly) loses the 'Quick Reply' in FireFox.
Well, if you're using Windows, try installing the Dutch input locale. Control Panel -> Regional Options, Input Locales tab. Make sure you let the thing put an indicator in the tray. You can also define a key sequence to switch, or to go to a specific one.

   
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