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Old 08-02-2006, 06:59 PM   #1
ktinkel
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Default Amazing tomato-garlic pizza!

Someone on the Cooks Forum on CompuServe quoted a tomato tart recipe from Martha Stewart’s cooking show that caught my eye. It called for pâte brissée (aka butter pastry) and fresh tomatoes). I try to avoid butter, my bête noire, and could not for the life of me find the latter at this season, but we needed something for dinner tonight, so I decided to improvise. Here is what I did:

1. Sent Jack to the Stop & Shop for fresh pizza dough. (If you do not live in the U.S. Northeast or in southern Italy, this may not be an option. Sometimes pizzerias will sell you dough, but if not, make a pizza dough of flour, yeast, salt, water, and, if you like, some decent olive oil).

2. Took a head of garlic, drizzled olive oil over it, wrapped it in aluminum foil, and baked it for 30 to 45 minutes in a 350 °F degree oven, until a sharp knife pierced each clove. Set it aside to cool.

3. Sliced the best tomatoes I could find into quarter-inch-thick slices. Salted them lightly and placed them on a rack in a 400 °F oven, and roasted them until slightly crinkled and dried out. Set aside.

4. Coarsely grated about a cup of fontina cheese. Mashed the roasted garlic with about a tablespoon of olive oil and a sprinkling of salt. Cut a handful of basil leaves into shreds.

5. Stretched about two-thirds of a pound of dough into a rough circle, about a quarter inch thick and 13 inches in diameter. Placed it on a piece of parchment paper, trimmed roughly to fit.

6. Spread the roasted garlic/olive oil mixture over the dough. Sprinkled cheese lightly over that, and placed basil shreds over that.

7. Spread the tomato slices over the dough, overlapping them slightly. Sprinkled more cheese lightly over the tomatoes.

8. Slid the pizza on its parchment onto the quarry tiles* in the bottom of my 475 °F oven, and baked it for roughly fifteen minutes (until the crust was brown, the cheese bubbly, and other signs of cooked pizza arose).

9. Gobbled it up with a nice zinfandel.

*If you do not have a pizza stone or quarry tiles in the bottom of your oven, place a stack of aluminum half-sheet pans on a lower shelf in while pre-heating and use them. But really, it is best to have stones. A batch of 6-inch quarry tiles is cheap and useful for all sorts of cooking.

   
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Old 08-03-2006, 12:56 AM   #2
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KT: you have me drooling and it's only just past breakfast time!

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Originally Posted by ktinkel
I try to avoid butter, my bête noire, and could not for the life of me find the latter at this season
I think you can buy bêtes noire at the better class of farmer's market

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Originally Posted by ktinkel
Took a head of garlic, drizzled olive oil over it, wrapped it in aluminum foil, and baked it for 30 to 45 minutes in a 350 °F degree oven, until a sharp knife pierced each clove.
Hmm: with the price of propane here, that would probably cost about as much as the whole ingredients just for cooking the garlic. I wonder if you could pre-cook the cloves when doing a roast and freeze them for later use?
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Old 08-03-2006, 06:01 AM   #3
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KT: you have me drooling and it's only just past breakfast time!
That was my reaction to the original recipe, which included a very effective photo!

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I think you can buy bêtes noire at the better class of farmer's market


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Hmm: with the price of propane here, that would probably cost about as much as the whole ingredients just for cooking the garlic. I wonder if you could pre-cook the cloves when doing a roast and freeze them for later use?
I don’t know why not. Because I was reworking the recipe in a sort of ad hoc way, I did not put the tomatoes in with the garlic; if I had, it would have saved some fuel. The garlic is wrapped in foil, so you could probably cook it in a toaster oven or on a grill.

I was about to exclaim at your propane costs but then thought I should first go see what our natural gas costs for 45 minutes of oven use. Might be even worse. But if I calculated the cost of cooking, I might give it up altogether. Jack and I would have to eat raw vegetables!

I actually roasted the garlic and tomatoes, antisocially in this heat wave with its strain on power, in my electric “caterer’s oven” — a sort of super toaster oven. Not that electricity is cheap, either.


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Old 08-03-2006, 06:24 AM   #4
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1. Sent Jack to the Stop & Shop for fresh pizza dough. (If you do not live in the U.S. Northeast or in southern Italy, this may not be an option.
I live in the U.S. Northeast, about three miles from the nearest Stop & Shop, but I can't for the life of me figure out how to send Jack there.

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Old 08-03-2006, 09:11 AM   #5
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I live in the U.S. Northeast, about three miles from the nearest Stop & Shop, but I can't for the life of me figure out how to send Jack there.
Yourself!

Maybe not to your Stop & Shop, but one of ours. Then he would have to Fedex the dough to you— may not work out too well. Guess you’ll have to go there yourself. (Tip: They keep the good fresh dough in the custom baking section.)


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Old 08-03-2006, 11:36 AM   #6
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Sounds perfectly divine!!!

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Old 08-03-2006, 05:26 PM   #7
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Sounds perfectly divine!!!
It did come close to divinity, and to perfection. One of those things that just worked.

Make it, or con a relative or friend into making it for you — you won’t regret it.


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Old 08-03-2006, 03:26 PM   #8
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I made this recipe last week too. It was absolutely excellent. I cheated, though, and used Pillsbury pie crust. What really made this dish shine was the roasted garlic paste on the crust! I too added the basil. It's a real winner.

   
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Old 08-03-2006, 05:23 PM   #9
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I made this recipe last week too. It was absolutely excellent. I cheated, though, and used Pillsbury pie crust. What really made this dish shine was the roasted garlic paste on the crust! I too added the basil. It's a real winner.
I cheated too, using pizza dough. Although I adore pate brisee (it was the first pie crust I was able to master, and that at 40, thanks to Jacques Pepin!), I think it might be a bit rich for this.

I agree: the garlic made it win. In fact, I am thinking we should put mashed roasted garlic puree on every crust! (Maybe not apple or blueberry pie, but all the others!)

Nice to have you back — we have missed you.


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Old 08-04-2006, 09:00 AM   #10
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This is a serious question.

What's quarry tile? Slate? Granite? Basalt? Synthetic stone?

-city boy
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