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Old 06-14-2006, 01:42 PM   #1
dcdesigngirl
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Default Print Brokering

Hi all:
I'm new to this forum but am really glad I found it. I run a new dataprocessing business outside of D.C. where I offer word processing, desktop publishing and printing.

I say all of this because I just signed up with a print broker called "ResellPrinting.com." Has anyone had any dealings with them? If so, what's their reputation? Can anyone recommend any other printers who allow print brokering?

Finally, this is a desktop publishing question? I want to create a portfolio to show to new clients. How many samples of each item, for example brochures, business cards, letterhead, etc. should I have in my portfolio?

Thanks in advance for your assistance!
dcdesigngirl
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Old 06-14-2006, 02:28 PM   #2
terrie
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I'm in the DC area and have not heard of them--not that it means much because I've never done print brokering...'-}}--but hopefully Marlene will see your post as she is also in the DC area and may have more info...

As for the portfolio, I think perhaps 2 or 3 examples of each type might be good particularly if they each show a different approach so you can show your flexibility...

Welcome to the forum...

Terrie
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Old 06-15-2006, 04:28 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcdesigngirl
I want to create a portfolio to show to new clients. How many samples of each item, for example brochures, business cards, letterhead, etc. should I have in my portfolio?
One, normally. You might have two, if you have mounted the samples under plastic, one for each side, or three if you want to show a brochure folded and open both sides. Just think of the way you will be presenting the portfolio.

This does not mean you shouldn't skim a few more extra copies of the pieces, particularly if the pieces are not under plastic. With handling, eventually they could start to look ragged, and it is nice to be able to replace them.

If you have several copies of a piece, there is a chance that the client will ask for one "to show the boss." They then could take the piece and show it to a cheaper competitor to copy, cutting you out of the work. If there is only one, it is easier to say. "Sorry, I only have the one copy. But I'd love to show it to your boss if you can arrange something."
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Old 06-15-2006, 09:07 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcdesigngirl
I say all of this because I just signed up with a print broker called "ResellPrinting.com." Has anyone had any dealings with them? If so, what's their reputation? Can anyone recommend any other printers who allow print brokering?
I do not know them, but suspect that signing up with a print broker in order to do print brokering means that, at the low end of the totem pole, you will not make much money.

As a graphic designer I used to broker printing in NYC. I worked with several printers, typesetters, platemakers, and other specialists. A client would ask for something — brochure, art gallery postcards, booklets, whatever. I would design it and then run around to my printing specialists to get it made. I marked up all their charges by 15%, added about 20% for my extra services, and billed that as the printing charge on my design bill.

The clients liked it because it saved them worry about quality and timing. If need be, I would be ‘on press’ when the job was run and could catch last-minute problems. I earned my fee, too.

But I wonder if you will be able to do any of that when working for a brokering service. You are effectively just a commission salesperson, with no ability to help your customers by monitoring quality and schedule.

Most printers are open to brokering arrangements, btw. They like working with a known quantity — working directly with end customers is harder than working with someone who knows the lingo, understands the quality issues, knows how to prepare art for printing, and so on.

Good luck with it. But keep your eyes open for other opportunities if you decide you like (and are good at) brokering.

   
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Old 06-15-2006, 12:14 PM   #5
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I read the original posting as a person who has signed up with a print broker to do design work when needed by the print broker's customers, as opposed to working as a broker or doing sales for a broker.
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Old 06-15-2006, 03:46 PM   #6
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Hi Donmcc:
No, I'm a desktop publisher/word processing company who would also like to offer printing services to my clients. So, I found the company ResellPrinting.com on the internet and signed up with them. But I was just wondering if anyone else has heard of them and if there are any other companies that do print brokering.

Thanks to everyone for their responses!
dcdesigngirl

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I read the original posting as a person who has signed up with a print broker to do design work when needed by the print broker's customers, as opposed to working as a broker or doing sales for a broker.
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Old 06-16-2006, 04:57 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by dcdesigngirl
Hi Donmcc:
No, I'm a desktop publisher/word processing company who would also like to offer printing services to my clients.
Then wouldn't it be better to find a printing company or two. That way you can absorb the profit that the broker will be taking.
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Old 06-15-2006, 09:19 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcdesigngirl
. . . a desktop publishing question? I want to create a portfolio to show to new clients. How many samples of each item, for example brochures, business cards, letterhead, etc. should I have in my portfolio?
Samples for your printing business?

Those usually serve as templates for customers to choose from. In some cases, they show customers what printed items they may need — a new business person might not think of needing an invoice form, for example, but you can show it as part of a letterhead and card set.

Doesn’t your broker supply samples of printing for you? It says they do on their web site.

Paper companies often give away examples of work to promote their types of stock. You can show those as examples of what can be done (since I assume you are not selling your services as a designer? you would not want to suggest that these are your work).

Good luck. Sounds like fun.

   
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Old 06-15-2006, 12:10 PM   #9
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AS u call yourself DCDesigngirl- I will assume that u are starting your own design business and offering clients a printing service as well.
Print brookers do have a part to play when producing stationery and 4pp 8pp etc - but when you want to really show off your design capability and design something special u really need to have a relationship with a printer to advice you
As far as samples are concerned - they are used mainly to give you credibility - so if you are sitting in front of a large corporate account and you only have samples of cafes and haidresses work u may have problems - its not impossible to handle but it makes it more difficult - Its always good to remember that the client will use u because he trusts what u say - he buys into u - that judgement is made usually very earlier on in the conversation - and its better to talk about the project he wants doing than show samples
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Old 06-20-2006, 11:03 PM   #10
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Personally, I'd never broker printing with an out-of-town printer that I'd never worked with. I think almost any printer will allow brokering -- I would think most of them don't care who pays them, as long as they get paid. Do you have local printers you've already worked with?

And don't forget, if your client is unhappy with the print job, you're stuck in the middle -- you have to pay the printer, whether or not your client pays you.

Oh, and don't forget the cost of shipping/delivery if you use an out-of-town printer.

mxh
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