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Old 10-29-2005, 01:30 PM   #1
Michael Rowley
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Default Help! What does InDesign call running heads?

What does InDesign call what publishers used to call running headlines and most DTP (and WP) programs call 'headers'?

I can't find the appropriate entry in InDesign's 'Help'.

   
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Old 10-29-2005, 01:45 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Michael Rowley
What does InDesign call what publishers used to call running headlines and most DTP (and WP) programs call 'headers'?

I can't find the appropriate entry in InDesign's 'Help'.
I doubt it has any special name for them. Just set up the appropriate text on the master pages, and create character/paragraph styles to suit.

Or do I misunderstand what you are asking?

   
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Old 10-29-2005, 02:14 PM   #3
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KT:

Just set up the appropriate text on the master pages

Thank you. Logical, I suppose, but unusual all the same.

   
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Old 10-29-2005, 05:38 PM   #4
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Thank you. Logical, I suppose, but unusual all the same.
Actually, the normal procedure with page layout programs (in my experience, anyway).

   
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Old 10-30-2005, 07:36 AM   #5
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KT:

the normal procedure with page layout programs

Yes, I accept that, but the topic is usually mentioned, I hope (FrameMaker discusses the subject), and I was not expecting the term 'header' to be appropriated for the heads of columns in tables. I would also mention that W—— (I won't mention the name aloud, for fear of upsetting anyone) provides three possible running headings in every section: for the first page and for subsequent verso and recto pages.

While we're on the subject, do DTP programs habitually refer to the spaces between columns as 'gutters'? InDesign does.

   
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Old 10-30-2005, 09:15 AM   #6
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Michael,

Ventura Publisher does -- I don't know about other programs. It is the correct term, is it not? I never thought about it before because I've never heard them referred to in any other way, even back when we had to take our copy in to a good old-fashioned typesetter. (My how times have changed ... I wonder if our waxer still works?)

   
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Old 10-30-2005, 10:34 AM   #7
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Franca:

It is the correct term, is it not?

Gutter? It used to mean the bit between adjacent outer pages on the press, which of course was discarded when the sheets were trimmed—but that was possibly only in England. In America I believe the 'gutter' is the extra space allowed for binding at the inner margin.

   
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Old 10-30-2005, 04:58 PM   #8
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Michael,

Yes, here the page gutter would be the binding space at the inside margin between two pages that form a spread. But columns also have gutters -- the space between two columns. What do you call spaces between columns there?

   
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Old 10-31-2005, 08:05 AM   #9
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Franca:

What do you call spaces between columns there?

I don't think there is a special name for them here, but American programs (which are used here, of course) speak of the 'spacing' generally. Serif however (an English company, I think) says 'gap'.

It seems reasonable to call the added space between the inner margins the 'gutter', since the space between the outer margins interests the mainly the printer, who of course wants it to be as little as possible.

Incidentally, I haven't the remotest idea about the gutter needed for binding books, but I suppose typographers need to know. I imagine that if conventional book-binding is used, the gutter need be not much more than a couple of millimetres, but that is a practical point that isn't apparent to someone whose bookbinding experience was limited to slapping hot glue on to the back of a book that had been trimmed (very inexpertly) by hand. When I come to think of it, the schoolmaster that taught us must have been very brave.

   
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Old 10-31-2005, 10:07 AM   #10
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It seems reasonable to call the added space between the inner margins the 'gutter', since the space between the outer margins interests the mainly the printer, who of course wants it to be as little as possible.
And because when you open the finished book, what you get really is a gutter. If you spilled your tea on the book, that's where the run-off would go!

Quote:
I imagine that if conventional book-binding is used, the gutter need be not much more than a couple of millimetres, but that is a practical point that isn't apparent to someone whose bookbinding experience was limited to slapping hot glue on to the back of a book that had been trimmed (very inexpertly) by hand. When I come to think of it, the schoolmaster that taught us must have been very brave.
Gutter size depends, for one thing, on the number of pages in the book. Thickness of paper stock, too, now that I think about it. We've never done a book here that was large enough for it to be of much concern.

Indeed, your schoolmaster must have been brave and patient. In fact the word "saint" comes to mind! I have the utmost respect for anyone with the courage to teach large classrooms full of children. Tutoring small groups of four or five was as much as I was ever willing to take on, though one on one was better still.

   
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